consonantal


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Related to consonantal: coronal

con·so·nan·tal

 (kŏn′sə-năn′tl)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, or having the nature of a consonant.
2. Containing a consonant or consonants.

con′so·nan′tal·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

consonantal

(ˌkɒnsəˈnæntəl)
adj
1. (Phonetics & Phonology) relating to, functioning as, or constituting a consonant, such as the semivowel w in English work
2. (Phonetics & Phonology) consisting of or characterized by consonants: a consonantal cluster.
ˌconsoˈnantally adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

con•so•nan•tal

(ˌkɒn səˈnæn tl)

adj.
consisting of or containing consonants.
[1785–95]
con`so•nan′tal•ly, adv.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.consonantal - being or marked by or containing or functioning as a consonant; "consonantal sounds"; "a consonantal Hebrew text"; "consonantal alliteration"; "a consonantal cluster"
vocalic - being or containing or characterized by vowels; "vocalic sounds"; "the Gaelic language being uncommonly vocalic"- Walter Scott
2.consonantal - relating to or having the nature of a consonant
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

consonantal

[ˌkɒnsəˈnæntl] ADJconsonántico
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

consonantal

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

consonantal

[ˌkɒnsəˈnæntl] adjconsonantico/a
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
To a present-day reader the verse sounds crude, the more so because of the harshly consonantal character of the Anglo-Saxon language; and in comparison with modern poetry it is undoubtedly unmelodious.
i) A combination of consonantal root with vocalic template which sometimes includes additional consonants, for example gadal 'grew up', higdil 'increased', gidel 'raised', and migdal 'tower', all of which are derived from the root [square root]gdl using the following templates: CaCaC, hiCCiC, CiCeC, miCCaC.
It is written on full "cynghanedd", the challenging system of consonantal correspondences and internal rhyme peculiar to the poetry-orientated Welsh language.
Note that all Semitic scripts, Hebrew and Syriac among them, share such peculiarities they are all consonantal and they all move from right to left, and yet there is one exception, a telltale exception.
(9) Note additionally that this feature is attested in Akkadian (see Table 1) and that the consonantal inventory of Ugaritic is closer to that of Classical Arabic than Canaanite, although few scholars have used this similarity to argue for an Arabo-Ugaritic subgroup.
We know that the consonantal framework of words needs to be clearly articulated We should give special attention to word endings and to double consonants, for we never quite do justice to these in our daily speech.
The Estonian consonantal inventory is evaluated as relatively small against the typological background (p.
The [d] in "red" is linked consonantally to a [d] in each of the other three stanzas: "depends" in stanza 1, "glazed" in stanza 3, and "beside" in stanza 4; and outside of stanza 2, consonantal [n] links "upon" in stanza 1, to "rain" in stanza 3, to "chickens" in stanza 4, and consonantal [z] links "depends" in stanza 1, to "glazed" in stanza 3, to "chickens" in stanza 4.
Most consonantal contrasts are essential for successful communication and should therefore be preserved.