constellate


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con·stel·late

 (kŏn′stə-lāt′)
intr. & tr.v. con·stel·lat·ed, con·stel·lat·ing, con·stel·lates
To form or cause to form a group or cluster.

[Back-formation from constellation.]

constellate

(ˈkɒnstɪˌleɪt)
vb
to form into clusters in or as if in constellations

con•stel•late

(ˈkɒn stəˌleɪt)

v.i., v.t. -lat•ed, -lat•ing.
to cluster together, as stars in a constellation.
[1615–25; < Late Latin constellātus in the same constellation = Latin con- con- + stell(a) star + -ātus -ate1]

constellate


Past participle: constellated
Gerund: constellating

Imperative
constellate
constellate
Present
I constellate
you constellate
he/she/it constellates
we constellate
you constellate
they constellate
Preterite
I constellated
you constellated
he/she/it constellated
we constellated
you constellated
they constellated
Present Continuous
I am constellating
you are constellating
he/she/it is constellating
we are constellating
you are constellating
they are constellating
Present Perfect
I have constellated
you have constellated
he/she/it has constellated
we have constellated
you have constellated
they have constellated
Past Continuous
I was constellating
you were constellating
he/she/it was constellating
we were constellating
you were constellating
they were constellating
Past Perfect
I had constellated
you had constellated
he/she/it had constellated
we had constellated
you had constellated
they had constellated
Future
I will constellate
you will constellate
he/she/it will constellate
we will constellate
you will constellate
they will constellate
Future Perfect
I will have constellated
you will have constellated
he/she/it will have constellated
we will have constellated
you will have constellated
they will have constellated
Future Continuous
I will be constellating
you will be constellating
he/she/it will be constellating
we will be constellating
you will be constellating
they will be constellating
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been constellating
you have been constellating
he/she/it has been constellating
we have been constellating
you have been constellating
they have been constellating
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been constellating
you will have been constellating
he/she/it will have been constellating
we will have been constellating
you will have been constellating
they will have been constellating
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been constellating
you had been constellating
he/she/it had been constellating
we had been constellating
you had been constellating
they had been constellating
Conditional
I would constellate
you would constellate
he/she/it would constellate
we would constellate
you would constellate
they would constellate
Past Conditional
I would have constellated
you would have constellated
he/she/it would have constellated
we would have constellated
you would have constellated
they would have constellated
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.constellate - scatter or intersperse like dots or studs; "Hills constellated with lights"
cover, extend, continue - span an interval of distance, space or time; "The war extended over five years"; "The period covered the turn of the century"; "My land extends over the hills on the horizon"; "This farm covers some 200 acres"; "The Archipelago continues for another 500 miles"
2.constellate - come together as in a cluster or flock; "The poets constellate in this town every summer"
huddle, huddle together - crowd or draw together; "let's huddle together--it's cold!"
bunch, bunch together, bunch up - form into a bunch; "The frightened children bunched together in the corner of the classroom"
foregather, forgather, gather, assemble, meet - collect in one place; "We assembled in the church basement"; "Let's gather in the dining room"
3.constellate - form a constellation or cluster
form - assume a form or shape; "the water formed little beads"
References in periodicals archive ?
All three constellate around written and oral accounts, whether genealogies of royalty, idiomatic and culturally specific sayings, or positively drawn maxims.
English similarly delineates how a "credential society" (see Collins), within Daniel Bell's conception of a post-industrial information-age system of exchange (compare Bell), relies on the implicit patronage of literary prizes, and similar acts of symbolic value-ranking, to help constellate an "economy of prestige".
Come with me, we'll sit outside the cafe and I'll paint you a moon you've never seen, constellate your eyes with a shower of stars.
Aristotelianism" could not be said to constellate into a clearly coherent (and alternative or parallel) form of thought with which Aquinas could correlate Christian doctrine; as I have noted, Aristotle had been a vibrant part of theological reflection for nearly a century, and some of the most important arguments in the time of Aquinas and Bonaventure revolved around the question of what authentic Aristotelian thought was.
The child has sought a powerful archetypal ally in the collective that forms the core of an eventual complex around which the implicated shadows constellate.
In doing this, I will dip briefly into historical and current events, not to offer definitive interpretations of them (should such a feat be possible), but to constellate them in ways that disturb prevailing notions of what and where iconoclasm is occurring.
My key argument is that the particular Passion narrative selected by Gibson interpolates its audience so as to constellate a militarized, masculinized form of Christianity that presumes, indeed depends upon, the socially authorized suffering of obedient (read "soldierly") sons.
A certain number of women constellate around him while a collection of aspirants poke their heads through the crowd in such fervent hope of getting some attention that it looks like some kind of undignified game of Whack-A-Mole.
Though initially appearing as a bizarre non sequitur, the film's black-and-white images constellate sex with death and a loss of corporeal integrity, an apt objective correlative for the much-feared miscegenation that threatened to transform the purity and wholeness of the collective white Southern body into a pile of mixed, anonymous racial fractions.
Contemporary information's capacity for global circulation--its ability to constellate and engage multiple new communities of interpretation, as well as of production and reception--is perhaps the most crucial and dramatic result of its digitization.
Such judgments will be shown to constellate around cognitive exploration based on factors that are key conditions of objective knowledge, and of the unity of the self (4).
As bits of consciousnesses constellate, I rouse to a 3 A.