constitutionalize

(redirected from constitutionalising)
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con·sti·tu·tion·al·ize

 (kŏn′stĭ-to͞o′shə-nə-līz′, -tyo͞o′-)
tr.v. con·sti·tu·tion·al·ized, con·sti·tu·tion·al·iz·ing, con·sti·tu·tion·al·iz·es
1. To provide with or make subject to a constitution.
2. To incorporate into or sanction under a constitution: "The Fourteenth Amendment ... constitutionalized the vast shift of power from the states to the federal government, which the Civil War had accomplished" (Eric Foner).
3. To treat (an inappropriate matter) as being subject to constitutional law: "Today a like kind of wisdom might caution against constitutionalizing every grievance that might (or might not) appear tomorrow" (Potter Stewart).

con′sti·tu′tion·al·i·za′tion (-lĭ-zā′shən) n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

constitutionalize

(ˌkɒnstɪˈtjuːənəˌlaɪz) or

constitutionalise

vb (tr)
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) to provide with a constitution
2. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) to incorporate (something) into a constitution
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

con•sti•tu•tion•al•ize

(ˌkɒn stɪˈtu ʃə nlˌaɪz, -ˈtyu-)

v.t. -ized, -iz•ing.
1. to incorporate in a constitution; make constitutional.
2. to provide a constitution for.
[1825–35]
con`sti•tu`tion•al•i•za′tion, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.constitutionalize - provide with a constitution, as of a country; "The United States were constitutionalized in the late 18th century"
furnish, provide, supply, render - give something useful or necessary to; "We provided the room with an electrical heater"
2.constitutionalize - take a walk for one's health or to aid digestion, as after a meal; "A good way of exercising is to constitutionalize"
take the air, walk - take a walk; go for a walk; walk for pleasure; "The lovers held hands while walking"; "We like to walk every Sunday"
3.constitutionalize - incorporate into a constitution, make constitutional; "A woman's right to an abortion was constitutionalized in the 1970's"
alter, change, modify - cause to change; make different; cause a transformation; "The advent of the automobile may have altered the growth pattern of the city"; "The discussion has changed my thinking about the issue"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Constitutionalising and legalising this narrative and backing it with the Parliament's support, as per Khurshid Nadeem's words, will make it be recognised countrywide more than now .
* A brief, positive book review of 'Constitutionalising Secession' (2014) by David Haljan which includes chapters on Reference Re Quebec Secession and the Clarity Act.
David Haljan, Constitutionalising Secession (Hart 2014)
(16) Joyce Green, "Constitutionalising the Patriarchy: Aboriginal Women and Aboriginal Government" (1993) 4:4 Const Forum 110 at 112-13 [Green, "Constitutionalising the Patriarchy"].
"That can only be achieved through resurrecting the independent National Authority for Reform of Information and Communication, along with the need for constitutionalising media independence."
Daniel Cohn-Bendit (Greens-EFA) was the clearest: "This text is useless since it was designed to reassure markets by constitutionalising debt limits or the golden rule', but markets are not interested.
(33) This central point has much in common with arguments elsewhere that advocate the "constitutionalization" (Julia Black, "Constitutionalising Self-Regulation," Modern Law Review 59, no.
(12) James Allan departs from his usual root and branch critique of rights instruments to consider how a judge unfortunate enough to both believe Waldron's argument against constitutionalising individual rights, and yet sworn to uphold the laws of a society that has taken this step, might act.