constrainer


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con·strain

 (kən-strān′)
tr.v. con·strained, con·strain·ing, con·strains
1.
a. To keep within certain limits; confine or limit: "Legislators ... used the power of the purse to constrain the size of the military" (Julian E. Zelizer).
b. To inhibit or restrain; hold back: "She noticed her mother blushing and acting somewhat constrained in her conversation with the grandmother" (David Huddle).
2. To compel by physical, moral, or circumstantial force; oblige: felt constrained to object to his behavior.
3. To produce in a forced or inhibited manner: "This smile seemed to touch something off in her ... and playfully she constrained her own roguish smile" (Naeem Murr).

[Middle English constreinen, from Old French constraindre, constraign-, from Latin cōnstringere, to restrain, compress : com-, com- + stringere, to bind, press together; see streig- in Indo-European roots.]

con·strain′a·ble adj.
con·strain′ed·ly (-strā′nĭd-lē) adv.
con·strain′er n.
References in periodicals archive ?
Despite the fact that the political environment is pointed out as a constrainer or supporter of DMNCs strategies, only anecdotal information exists about how, and through which mechanisms, the interaction between DMNCs and governments occurs.
In other words, it could be stated that working memory is an important performance constrainer in reading activity, especially in L2 reading where different variables, as stated above, may play a role in the achievement of comprehension.
Documented by film and a series of archival boxes specific to each particular location, evidence was gathered and became the inspiration for a new body of work comprising deep etch prints, large scale drawings and objects including the pieces Piercing Rim, Circlet, Silent Constrainer and Splinter.
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