constrict


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Related to constrict: prodigy

constrict

cause to contract or shrink; to draw in; compress; to slow the natural course of: Too many rules can constrict a child’s development.
Not to be confused with:
astrict – to bind fast; constrain: The court will astrict the witness from making a public statement at this time.

con·strict

 (kən-strĭkt′)
v. con·strict·ed, con·strict·ing, con·stricts
v.tr.
1. To make smaller or narrower by binding or squeezing.
2. To squeeze or compress.
3. To restrict the scope or freedom of; cramp: lives constricted by poverty.
v.intr.
To become constricted.

[Latin cōnstringere, cōnstrict-, to compress; see constrain.]

con·stric′tive adj.
con·stric′tive·ly adv.

constrict

(kənˈstrɪkt)
vb (tr)
1. to make smaller or narrower, esp by contracting at one place
2. to hold in or inhibit; limit
[C18: from Latin constrictus compressed, from constringere to tie up together; see constrain]

con•strict

(kənˈstrɪkt)

v.t.
1. to draw or press in; compress.
2. to cause to contract or shrink.
3. to slow or stop the natural course or development of.
v.i.
4. to become constricted.
[1725–35; < Latin constrīctus,constringere to draw together, tie up <con- + stringere to tie; compare strict]
con•stric′tive, adj.

constrict


Past participle: constricted
Gerund: constricting

Imperative
constrict
constrict
Present
I constrict
you constrict
he/she/it constricts
we constrict
you constrict
they constrict
Preterite
I constricted
you constricted
he/she/it constricted
we constricted
you constricted
they constricted
Present Continuous
I am constricting
you are constricting
he/she/it is constricting
we are constricting
you are constricting
they are constricting
Present Perfect
I have constricted
you have constricted
he/she/it has constricted
we have constricted
you have constricted
they have constricted
Past Continuous
I was constricting
you were constricting
he/she/it was constricting
we were constricting
you were constricting
they were constricting
Past Perfect
I had constricted
you had constricted
he/she/it had constricted
we had constricted
you had constricted
they had constricted
Future
I will constrict
you will constrict
he/she/it will constrict
we will constrict
you will constrict
they will constrict
Future Perfect
I will have constricted
you will have constricted
he/she/it will have constricted
we will have constricted
you will have constricted
they will have constricted
Future Continuous
I will be constricting
you will be constricting
he/she/it will be constricting
we will be constricting
you will be constricting
they will be constricting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been constricting
you have been constricting
he/she/it has been constricting
we have been constricting
you have been constricting
they have been constricting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been constricting
you will have been constricting
he/she/it will have been constricting
we will have been constricting
you will have been constricting
they will have been constricting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been constricting
you had been constricting
he/she/it had been constricting
we had been constricting
you had been constricting
they had been constricting
Conditional
I would constrict
you would constrict
he/she/it would constrict
we would constrict
you would constrict
they would constrict
Past Conditional
I would have constricted
you would have constricted
he/she/it would have constricted
we would have constricted
you would have constricted
they would have constricted
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.constrict - squeeze or press together; "she compressed her lips"; "the spasm contracted the muscle"
choke, strangle - constrict (someone's) throat and keep from breathing
prim - contract one's lips; "She primmed her lips after every bite of food"
tighten - become tight or tighter; "The rope tightened"
astringe - constrict or bind or draw together; "Lemon juice astringes the tissue in the mouth"
strangulate - constrict a hollow organ or vessel so as to stop the flow of blood or air
convulse - contract involuntarily, as in a spasm; "The muscles in her face convulsed"
convulse - cause to contract; "The spasm convulses her facial muscles"
bear down, overbear - contract the abdominal muscles during childbirth to ease delivery
choke, gag, fret - be too tight; rub or press; "This neckband is choking the cat"
scrag, choke - wring the neck of; "The man choked his opponent"
2.constrict - become tight or as if tight; "Her throat constricted"
astringe - become constricted or compressed; "The cold substance astringes"
strangulate - become constricted; "The hernia will strangulate"
tighten - become tight or tighter; "The rope tightened"

constrict

verb
1. squeeze, contract, narrow, restrict, shrink, tighten, pinch, choke, cramp, strangle, compress, strangulate Severe migraine can be treated with a drug which constricts the blood vessels.
2. limit, restrict, confine, curb, inhibit, delimit, straiten Senators crafting the bill were frequently constricted by budget limits.

constrict

verb
1. To make smaller or narrower:
2. To reduce in size, as by drawing together:
3. To subject to compression:
4. To check the freedom and spontaneity of:
Translations
شَد، ضَغْط، خَنْق
sevřítstisknout
indsnævre
reyra, herpa
varžytiveržti
saspiestsažņaugtspiestžņaugt

constrict

[kənˈstrɪkt] VT [+ muscle] → oprimir; [+ vein] → estrangular; [+ movements] → restringir

constrict

[kənˈstrɪkt]
vt
[+ throat, blood vessel] → rétrécir, resserrer
(= limit) [+ person, action] → gêner
vi [throat, blood vessel] → se resserrer

constrict

vt
(= compress)einzwängen, einengen; musclezusammenziehen; veinverengen
(= hamper, limit) movementsbehindern, einschränken (also fig); breathingbehindern; (rules, traditions etc)einengen; outlook, view etcbeschränken

constrict

[kənˈstrɪkt] vt (throat, waist, blood vessels) → stringere; (movements) → impedire; (freedom) → limitare

constrict

(kənˈstrikt) verb
to press tightly; to cramp. The tight collar was constricting his neck.

constrict

1. v. apretar, estrangular;
2. comprimir

constrict

vt (blood vessels, etc.) contraer; (blood flow) restringir; vi (blood vessels, etc.) contraerse
References in classic literature ?
Yet strange to say Boris' presence in his wife's drawing room (and he was almost always there) had a physical effect upon Pierre; it constricted his limbs and destroyed the unconsciousness and freedom of his movements.
He studied the effects of adrenin on various parts of the body; he found that it causes the pupils to dilate, hairs to stand erect, blood vessels to be constricted, and so on.
From that glass door the pale-faced man went to the count's bedroom and raised with a constricted hand the curtain of a window overlooking the court-yard.
Father Brown's smooth brow became suddenly constricted. "Was the other bullet found?" he demanded.
MANILA -- Policymakers have to ensure that recent banking reforms that aim to minimize unnecessary risks dont constrict lending funds for key infrastructure projects to cement the regions growth prospects.
In healthy people, the ability of arteries to relax or constrict is kept in balance.
"We did have a joke afterwards - apparently these are snakes which constrict but it would have to be one very strong snake to constrict the ladies who come here!" Katie Hodgkins, of KBN Reptiles, said the snake appeared to have been on the loose for some time.
This lack of oxygen can cause acid to build, causing new pain that is then sent back through the cycle to cause the neurovascular nerves to constrict the blood flow again.
During an attack, inflamed airways constrict, obstructing air flow.
Although news of the deal was reported in May, sources say that the negotiations cooled in the ensuing months because the bank had concerns whether the space would constrict its ability to grow.
The nature of the spaces also changes as you rise through the building as sloping walls converge to constrict the two upper levels, where the living accommodation takes on a more traditional domestic scale and attic-like quality, being timber-lined and more intimate in character.
"Those countries with only one energy source will run the risk of getting caught in a bottleneck that will constrict growth," Gluski says.

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