constructionism


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constructionism

(kənˈstrʌkʃənɪzəm)
n
an educational theory holding that children learn most effectively when actively doing, or constructing, things, rather than being taught information in a traditional schooling methodthe theory that beliefs are constructed socially or culturally

constructionism

the use of or reliance on construction or constructive methods. — constructionist, n.
See also: Attitudes
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In sections on influential traditions, research designs, the researcher, and challenges, they consider such topics as qualitative research as interpretive social science, constructionism for qualitative research in business and management, the case study in management research: beyond the positivist legacy of Eisenhardt and Yin, muted masculinities: ethical and personal challenges for male qualitative researchers interviewing women, and ethics creep from the core to the periphery.
Social constructionism basic assumption is that reality is socially constructed, and that its construction is rooted in language and discourse (Burr, 1995).
This study draws on the principles of social constructionism to address this problem.
Systems theory is the basis of traditional family therapies, while social constructionism also informs more contemporary, postmodern approaches to family counseling (Gehart, 2014; Ivey el al.
It also coincides with the Papert's theory of constructionism since children get to see actual pictures by naming objects without any adult's interference or supervision.
Also, social constructionism asserts that what is considered masculine by society is dynamic and can evolve (Fee, 1992; Rangel & Keller, 2011; Wester & Vogel, 2012).
She cited the concept of constructionism as the principle on which the lab is based and showed how her students were able to learn more by constructing microscopes and using them instead of being given access to microscopes and assigned work.
1) The issue of mandatory influenza immunisation for nurses has ignored the intersection of social constructionism and critical realism regarding the concrete, objective presentation of science and nurses' epistemological and ontological realities.
By contrast what I am pursuing as education is constructionism meaning to learn what you can on your own.
When introducing newcomers to constructivism, I typically highlight three specific constructivist theories: personal construct psychology, radical constructivism, and social constructionism (Raskin, 2002).

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