constructivism


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con·struc·tiv·ism

 (kən-strŭk′tə-vĭz′əm)
n.
A movement in modern art originating in Moscow in 1920 and characterized by the use of industrial materials such as glass, sheet metal, and plastic to create nonrepresentational, often geometric objects.

con·struc′tiv·ist n.

constructivism

(kənˈstrʌktɪˌvɪzəm)
n
1. (Art Movements) a movement in abstract art evolved in Russia after World War I, primarily by Naum Gabo, which explored the use of movement and machine-age materials in sculpture and had considerable influence on modern art and architecture
2. (Philosophy) philosophy the theory that mathematical entities do not exist independently of our construction of them. Compare intuitionism4, finitism
conˈstructivist adj, n

con•struc•tiv•ism

(kənˈstrʌk təˌvɪz əm)

n. (sometimes cap.)
a nonrepresentational style of art developed in Russia in the early 20th century and characterized chiefly by a severe formality and by the use of modern industrial materials.
[1920–25]
con•struc′tiv•ist, n., adj.

constructivism

the theories, attitudes, and techniques of a group of Soviet writers of the 1920s who attempted to reconcile ideological beliefs with technical achievement, especially in stage design, where effects produced were geometrical and nonrepresentational. — constructivist, n., adj.
See also: Drama
the theories, attitudes, and techniques of a group of Soviet writers of the 1920s who attempted to reconcile ideological beliefs with technical achievement, especially in stage design, where the effects produced were geometrical and nonrepresentational. — constructivist, n., adj.
See also: Literary Style
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.constructivism - an abstractionist artistic movement in Russia after World War I; industrial materials were used to construct nonrepresentational objects
art movement, artistic movement - a group of artists who agree on general principles
constructivist - an artist of the school of constructivism
Translations
konstruktivizam
constructivisme
konstruktivism

constructivism

[kənˈstrʌktɪvɪzəm] Nconstructivismo m
References in periodicals archive ?
His argument rests on an unresolved tension in Rawls's corpus, between representationalism and constructivism.
She said: "The differences between Constructivism and Stalinism, as the show illustrates, aren't as clear cut as typical architectural histories would have you believe.
The chapter on career development theory also adds consideration of constructivism, social constructivism, and chaos theory.
Preparing Change Agents for the Classroom: From Paradigm to Practice (Cole, 2012a) challenges teacher educators to embrace constructivism as a teaching philosophy in their teacher preparation classes in order to encourage "change agency" in teacher candidates.
aWe express hope that the talks between the sides will continue in the spirit of constructivism and mutual respect as demonstrated in Geneva.
He drew source material for his series of abstractions from a range of art movements and cultures including Russian Constructivism, Tibetan prayer woodcuts, and stenciling techniques of the architect Louis Sullivan.
Barbara Bassot presents a view of social constructivism derived from the work of Vygotsky.
1 bears traces of Borkovec's future compositional thinking, already influenced by the avant-garde--or the bulk of that which makes up the substance of his Constructivist approach to creation and is also germane to Constructivism as such.
Entitled Constructivism and English Artists, the talk will take place at 12.
Various Squares at Gallery150 in Leamington shows abstract paintings which are highly influenced by constructivism.
The constructivists, in turn, shifted the focus to the processes of facilitating an individual's construction of meanings, which morphed into social constructivism when we added Vygotsky to Piaget.
It takes a catechistical approach to explain the idea of constructivism to the general reader.