constructivism


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con·struc·tiv·ism

 (kən-strŭk′tə-vĭz′əm)
n.
A movement in modern art originating in Moscow in 1920 and characterized by the use of industrial materials such as glass, sheet metal, and plastic to create nonrepresentational, often geometric objects.

con·struc′tiv·ist n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

constructivism

(kənˈstrʌktɪˌvɪzəm)
n
1. (Art Movements) a movement in abstract art evolved in Russia after World War I, primarily by Naum Gabo, which explored the use of movement and machine-age materials in sculpture and had considerable influence on modern art and architecture
2. (Philosophy) philosophy the theory that mathematical entities do not exist independently of our construction of them. Compare intuitionism4, finitism
conˈstructivist adj, n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

con•struc•tiv•ism

(kənˈstrʌk təˌvɪz əm)

n. (sometimes cap.)
a nonrepresentational style of art developed in Russia in the early 20th century and characterized chiefly by a severe formality and by the use of modern industrial materials.
[1920–25]
con•struc′tiv•ist, n., adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

constructivism

the theories, attitudes, and techniques of a group of Soviet writers of the 1920s who attempted to reconcile ideological beliefs with technical achievement, especially in stage design, where effects produced were geometrical and nonrepresentational. — constructivist, n., adj.
See also: Drama
the theories, attitudes, and techniques of a group of Soviet writers of the 1920s who attempted to reconcile ideological beliefs with technical achievement, especially in stage design, where the effects produced were geometrical and nonrepresentational. — constructivist, n., adj.
See also: Literary Style
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.constructivism - an abstractionist artistic movement in Russia after World War I; industrial materials were used to construct nonrepresentational objects
art movement, artistic movement - a group of artists who agree on general principles
constructivist - an artist of the school of constructivism
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
konstruktivizam
constructivisme
konstruktivism

constructivism

[kənˈstrʌktɪvɪzəm] Nconstructivismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in periodicals archive ?
Asserting that mainstream constructivism does not pay enough attention to everyday politics, this book offers a framework for remodeling constructivism to make it more politically attuned, drawing on Antonio Gramsci's theory of hegemony and on W.
Keywords: Constructivism, Theories of International Relations, Systemic Analysis.
Constructivism, in education, is deemed to be the primary pillar that led to the emergence of student-centered as a learning approach.
There are studies on online networks, social constructivism, and collaborative learning.
Constructivism theory is one of the models of the progressing emergence of international relations theory.
Through an archival investigation of the "textual genesis" of Nietzsche's essay, Jensen argues that this epistemological constructivism was carried over in a scattered fashion from the failed essay "On Truth and Lies" that Nietzsche was writing at the same time and in the same notebook as his essay on history.
Floristella contrasts the RSP approach to the conventional theoretical approaches most often used to analyse ASEAN: realism (and varieties thereof) and constructivism. Realism, especially its neorealist variant, dismisses ASEAN as largely irrelevant, while constructivism focuses on ASEAN as the focal point of a regional effort to build a Southeast Asian identity that is in the process of altering how regional states interact.
It is also interesting to notice that central to the Cognitivist epistemology are three key perspectives including contextual views, constructivism and information-processing theory (Jones, 1995).
Why is it that constructivism is so often referenced in the clinical literature, yet organizationally it counts only a small number of people among its identifiable adherents and struggles to sustain itself as a coherent movement within the field?
The main objective of this study was to investigate the higher secondary biology instruction in Pakistan in light of constructivism. The present study is concerned with the examination of higher secondary biology instruction taking into account constructivism as a learning theory that can be largely examined without considering broader philosophical or the epistemological standpoint of constructivism.
The article, 'Constructivism: A Holistic Approach to Teaching and Learning' by Janet Giesen, Faculty Development and Instructional Design Center, Northern Illinois University, offers constructivism as a learning theory.
The chapter on career development theory also adds consideration of constructivism, social constructivism, and chaos theory.

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