consubstantiation


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con·sub·stan·ti·a·tion

 (kŏn′səb-stăn′shē-ā′shən)
n.
The doctrine, held by some Christian churches, that the substance of the body and blood of Jesus coexists with the substance of the bread and wine in the Eucharist.

consubstantiation

(ˌkɒnsəbˌstænʃɪˈeɪʃən)
(in the belief of High-Church Anglicans) n
1. (Theology) the doctrine that after the consecration of the Eucharist the substance of the body and blood of Christ coexists within the substance of the consecrated bread and wine
2. (Theology) the mystical process by which this is believed to take place during consecration

con•sub•stan•ti•a•tion

(ˌkɒn səbˌstæn ʃiˈeɪ ʃən)

n.
the doctrine that the substance of the body and blood of Christ coexist in and with the bread and wine of the Eucharist.
[1590–1600; < New Latin]

consubstantiation

the doctrine that the substance of the body and blood of Christ coexist in and with the substance of the bread and wine of the Eucharist. Cf. receptionism, transubstantiation, virtualism.
See also: Theology
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.consubstantiation - the doctrine of the High Anglican Church that after the consecration of the Eucharist the substance of the body and blood of Christ coexists with the substance of the consecrated bread and wine
theological doctrine - the doctrine of a religious group
Translations

consubstantiation

n (Eccl) → Konsubstantiation f
References in periodicals archive ?
The formulation is logical in that self-extension as an actuality seems highly probable and is made possible by consubstantiation in Divine Ka meaning life rooted in shared spiritual essence (Azibo, 1996b, 2011d).
During the exhibition, the consubstantiation of this poem with the city became direct and material.
The fact that social movements linked to Via Campesina (Peasants' Way) embraced that agenda and were included in the formation of the ANA, was one of the decisive events for the consubstantiation of a vision and proposition of public policies with an agroecological approach, during recent years.
Examined critically in its full context, this text is a prima facie witness or background not for a conversion of the elements, what the later tradition called transubstantiation, but rather for some kind of multiple presences, what the later tradition called 11 consubstantiation. We will see this later, spelled out quite explicitly, in the teaching of Pope Gelasius.
Patrick Glenn, UNIDROIT Principles surpass a theoretical meaning and operate as practical consubstantiation of lex mercatoria: : "The UNIDROIT principles go beyond the lex mercatoria in its historical sense, because they provide a general codification of contractual principles intended to be applied in all international, commercial (though not consumer) contracts.
The marketing plan can be understood as the consubstantiation of the formal planning exercise, being the planning a helical procedure and the plan, a linear one (Campomar & Ikeda, 2006).
The substitution of images for the person might matter less for some prominent figures in the media, but because of the contextualized meanings of Martin the person and Martin the icon with protests, this person/symbol consubstantiation matters much more.
59), which leads to consubstantiation. In other words, identifying with an audience as a means to an end (i.e., identifying with the audience's beliefs), or by identifying opposites based on a common foe, or through an unconscious identification (e.g., being of the same race, gender, or region as are those one seeks to persuade) creates what Burke called "consubstantiality" or oneness with an audience (p.
McMichael calls Luther's view "consubstantiation." While he is careful to say that Luther never used the term, he says it is what Luther meant.
Lateran IV had ruled out the co-existence of bread and Christ's Body ('consubstantiation'), so Scotus and Ockham are left to admit that the bread substance is in some sense annihilated.