consul

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Related to consulships: consular

consul

a diplomat residing in a foreign country: the American consul in France
Not to be confused with:
council – a gathering of people for consultation: The matter was brought before the council for an opinion.
counsel – consultation; a lawyer; advice; guidance: She sought counsel for the proposed adoption.
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

con·sul

 (kŏn′səl)
n. Abbr. Con. or Cons.
1. An official appointed by a government to reside in a foreign country and represent his or her government's commercial interests and assist its citizens there. See Usage Note at council.
2. Either of the two chief magistrates of the Roman Republic, elected for a term of one year.
3. Any of the three chief magistrates of the French Republic from 1799 to 1804.

[Middle English, Roman consul, from Latin cōnsul; possibly akin to cōnsulere, to take counsel.]

con′su·lar (-sə-lər) adj.
con′sul·ship′ n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

consul

(ˈkɒnsəl)
n
1. (Government, Politics & Diplomacy) an official appointed by a sovereign state to protect its commercial interests and aid its citizens in a foreign city
2. (Historical Terms) (in ancient Rome) either of two annually elected magistrates who jointly exercised the highest authority in the republic
3. (Historical Terms) (in France from 1799 to 1804) any of the three chief magistrates of the First Republic
[C14: from Latin, from consulere to consult]
consular adj
ˈconsulˌship n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

con•sul

(ˈkɒn səl)

n.
1. an official appointed by the government of a country to look after its commercial interests and the welfare of its citizens in another country.
2. either of the two chief magistrates of the ancient Roman republic.
3. one of the three supreme magistrates of the French First Republic from 1799 to 1804.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin; taken to be a derivative of consulere to consult, but orig. and interrelationship of both words is unclear]
con′su•lar, adj.
con′sul•ship`, n.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.consul - a diplomat appointed by a government to protect its commercial interests and help its citizens in a foreign countryconsul - a diplomat appointed by a government to protect its commercial interests and help its citizens in a foreign country
diplomat, diplomatist - an official engaged in international negotiations
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
konzul
konsul
konsuli
konzul
konzul
ræîismaîur, konsúll
領事
영사
konsulaskonsulataskonsulinis
konsuls
konzul
konzul
konsul
กงสุล
konsoloskonsül
lãnh sự

consul

[ˈkɒnsəl] N (= diplomatic official) → cónsul mf
consul generalcónsul mf general
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

consul

[ˈkɒnsəl] n (= official) → consul m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

consul

nKonsul m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

consul

[ˈkɒnsəl] nconsole m
consul general → console generale
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

consul

(ˈkonsəl) noun
1. an agent who looks after his country's residents in (part of) a foreign country. the British Consul in Berlin.
2. either of the two chief magistrates in ancient Rome.
ˈconsular (-sju-) adjective
consulate (ˈkonsjulət) , ((American) -sələt) noun
the office or residence of a consul.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

consul

قُنْصُل konzul konsul Konsul πρόξενος cónsul konsuli consul konzul console 領事 영사 consul konsul konsul cônsul консул konsul กงสุล konsolos lãnh sự 领事
Multilingual Translator © HarperCollins Publishers 2009
References in classic literature ?
For when he had carried the consulship for a friend of his, against the pursuit of Sylla, and that Sylla did a little resent thereat, and began to speak great, Pompey turned upon him again, and in effect bade him be quiet; for that more men adored the sun rising, than the sun setting.
You hear the dull thud, thud of the ball, and the shouts of "Off your side," "Down with him," "Put him over," "Bravo." This is what we call "a scrummage," gentlemen, and the first scrummage in a School-house match was no joke in the consulship of Plancus.
Exploiting this new leverage of politics, Marius got himself elected to the position of consul six times between 107 and 100 BCE, utterly unprecedented in the annals of the republic and a violation of specific, long-standing legislation requiring 10 years to pass between consulships for any individual.
Eleven assumed cabinet appointments, consulships, or ambassadorships: Russell A.
Matching an event with the time of the consulships of X and Y is therefore a very solid way of dating that event.
Neruda, on the other hand, used political positions as another aspect of his role--during his life he held a number of political positions including a number of honorary consulships that took him to a range of destinations around the globe.
(1) "The people that once bestowed commands, consulships, legions, and all else, now concerns itself no more, and longs eagerly for just two things--bread and circuses," complained the first-century Roman writer Juvenal.
Moreover, any Roman commander who wished to stand for civic office--in particular, for one of the two annual consulships, the highest elected office in the Roman Republic--had first to disband his army and enter the city as a private citizen.
The Roman satirist Juvenal, writing in the first century AD, lamented that "the people that once bestowed commands, consulships, legions, and all else, now meddles no more and longs eagerly for just two things --bread and circuses." Juvenal had the misfortune of living in a time when the civic virtues of the early Roman republic were a distant memory, when the moral dry rot, which eventually destroyed Rome from within, was already far advanced.
He seemed not to know that the office he holds is as powerless as it is expensive to gain, rather like elections to the Roman consulships, which were retained to the end of the empire while Caesars did the ruling.
26.3 tells us that Augustus began his eighth and ninth consulships (26 and 25 B.C.) at Tarraco; another datable embassy from India falls in 20 B.C.