contender

(redirected from contendere)
Also found in: Thesaurus.
Related to contendere: No contest

con·tend

 (kən-tĕnd′)
v. con·tend·ed, con·tend·ing, con·tends
v.intr.
1. To strive in opposition or against difficulties; struggle: armies contending for control of territory; had to contend with long lines at the airport.
2. To strive in competition, as in a race; vie: two runners contending for the lead.
3. To strive in controversy or debate; dispute.
v.tr.
To assert or maintain: The defense contended that the evidence was inadmissible.

[Middle English contenden, from Latin contendere : com-, com- + tendere, to stretch, strive; see ten- in Indo-European roots.]

con·tend′er n.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.contender - the contestant you hope to defeatcontender - the contestant you hope to defeat; "he had respect for his rivals"; "he wanted to know what the competition was doing"
contestant - a person who participates in competitions
champ, champion, title-holder - someone who has won first place in a competition
comer - someone with a promising future
finalist - a contestant who reaches the final stages of a competition
foe, enemy - a personal enemy; "they had been political foes for years"
favourite, front-runner, favorite - a competitor thought likely to win
world-beater, king - a competitor who holds a preeminent position
runner-up, second best - the competitor who finishes second
scratch - a competitor who has withdrawn from competition
semifinalist - one of four competitors remaining in a tournament by elimination
street fighter - a contestant who is very aggressive and willing to use underhand methods
tier - any one of two or more competitors who tie one another
tilter - someone who engages in a tilt or joust
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

contender

noun competitor, rival, candidate, applicant, hopeful, contestant, aspirant Her trainer said yesterday that she would be a strong contender for a place in the British team.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

contender

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
مُنافِس، مُتَبارِ،مُشْتَرِك في مُباراه
soutěžícíuchazeč
konkurrencedeltagerudfordrer
keppandi
müsabıkyarışmacı

contender

[kənˈtendəʳ] N (= rival) → competidor(a) m/f (Sport etc) → contendiente mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

contender

[kənˈtɛndər] n (in competition, contest)concurrent(e) m/f
to be a contender for sth [player, athlete, team] → être un(e) prétendant(e) à qch; (for position, job)être un(e) candidat(e) à qch
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

contender

nKandidat(in) m(f), → Anwärter(in) m(f) (→ for auf +acc); (for job also) → Bewerber(in) m(f)(for um); (Sport) → Wettkämpfer(in) m(f)(for um)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

contender

[kənˈtɛndəʳ] ncontendente m/f, concorrente m/f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

contend

(kənˈtend) verb
1. (usually with with) to struggle against.
2. (with that) to say or maintain (that).
conˈtender noun
a person who has entered a competition (for a title etc).
conˈtention noun
1. an opinion put forward.
2. argument; disagreement.
conˈtentious (-ʃəs) adjective
quarrelsome.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
Importantly, entering a plea of nolo contendere to the charge can still cause your license application to be refused.
So when we thought about the likely regression in 2019 -- nolo contendere -- the assumption was that Baez would continue to swing as he did the final month of last season, trying to pull everything and hit 500-foot home runs, caught up in an MVP battle amid a crazy September pennant race.
A plea bargain is an agreement between a defendant and a prosecutor, in which the defendant agrees to plead guilty or "no contest" (nolo contendere) in exchange for an agreement by the prosecutor to drop one or more charges, reduce a charge to a less serious offence, or recommend to the judge a specific sentence acceptable to the defence.Deferred prosecution, on the other hand, is a type of plea bargain allowing a charge to be dropped under certain terms.
Trent Rashad Jones pled nolo contendere to two counts of distribution of cocaine, second offense, in violation of Virginia Code 18.2-248.
entered a plea of guilty or nolo contendere or has admitted sufficient
(200) Under United States Supreme Court precedent, statutes that implicitly give a defendant a discount in sentencing in exchange for a guilty or nolo contendere plea arc unconstitutional if the statute needlessly encourages such pleas or places an impermissible burden on a defendant's right to plead not guilty or to be tried by a jury.
* whether the judge has a regular plea deadline, the judge's policy concerning nolo contendere or Alford pleas, and
a plea of guilty, or a plea of nolo contendere. The admissibility of a
The confession model of plea bargaining is important enough that some critics of plea bargaining fiercely object to nolo contendere pleas, in which the defendant makes no admission but simply does not contest the charges, or Alford pleas, in which the defendant asserts innocence but accepts a plea.
In the chapter on government, the authors help budding reporters navigate government hierarchical systems as well as bureaucratic terms such as "eminent domain," "comptroller," and "easement." In the chapter on how to cover courts, the authors define terms such as "kangaroo court," "grand jury," and "nolo contendere."