continental crust


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continental crust

n
(Geological Science) geology that part of the earth's crust that underlies the continents and continental shelves
References in periodicals archive ?
Drilling equipment finds independent ecosystems lurking 10,000 feet below the continental crust.
In the second half of the 1960s, after geophysical investigations had proved the structural differences between continental and oceanic crusts, both Russian and American scientists decided to drill deep holes to better understand the Conrad and Mohorovicic (Moho) discontinuities (boundaries between the upper and lower continental crust and between the crust and mantle, respectively).
The study, titled "Giant magmatic water reservoirs at mid-crustal depth inferred from electrical conductivity and the growth of the continental crust," was published in the journal (http://www.
That peel is made up of a continental crust 30 to 40 kilometres thick.
Their trace element patterns are akin to those of Mull (Scotland), Skaergaard (Greenland), and Sabaloka (sudan) granites, which are emplaced in attenuated to normal continental crust.
If [the object] didn't hit a block of continental crust, then you cannot and will not find an impact site," Bambach says.
Available geophysical data suggest that the Newfoundland Basin contains a zone approximately 150 kilometers wide of thinned continental crust separating known Grand Banks continental crust from known oceanic crust seaward of a mid-Cretaceous period (about 118 million years ago) isochron, a magnetic anomaly known as MO.
It is also typically thinner than continental crust.
Lead author Steven Shirey at the Carnegie Institution's Department of Terrestrial Magnetism explained: "The Wilson cycle is responsible for the growth of the Earth's continental crust, the continental structures we see today, the opening and closing of ocean basins through time, mountain building, and the distribution of ores and other materials in the crust.
Accretion of the oceanic terranes to continental crust was mainly characterized by mdlanges and localized deformation.
Raghavan and his colleagues obtain similar conclusions and go on to suggest that, because one site is on continental crust and the other at the interface between continental and oceanic crust, it may even be possible to probe some aspects of the distribution of radioactive elements beneath Earth's surface.
We found zircons that we extracted from the beach sands, and these are something you typically find in a continental crust.

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