continuator


Also found in: Wikipedia.

con·tin·u·a·tor

 (kən-tĭn′yo͞o-ā′tər)
n.
One that continues, especially a person who carries on the work of another.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

continuator

(kənˈtɪnjʊˌeɪtə)
n
a person who continues something, esp the work of someone else
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

con•tin•u•a•tor

(kənˈtɪn yuˌeɪ tər)

n.
one that continues.
[1640–50]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Later, from the 1980s onwards, she was praised as one of the best late twentieth-century novelists together with Iris Murdoch and Doris Lessing, and--especially after her death--a perfect continuator of the great tradition landmarked by Jane Austen, the Brontes, George Eliot, and Virginia Woolf.
Therein lies a fact of author life: "Only the very top authors get promotional help," says Bob Goldsborough, a veteran journalist and, since the 1980s, the continuator author of the long-popular Nero Wolfe mystery series begun in 1934 by Rex Stout.
Most publications still refer to Howe and the continuator of his concept Brabham (2008).
Thus, while Napoleon is often credited with creating this style of warfare, for the great Prussian theorist Carl von Clausewitz, Napoleon was merely the continuator of a process really begun by Frederick William, Elector of Brandenburg.
The second generation in a family business: an agent of change or continuator of family tradition?
Probably the most important continuator of Freud in this respect was the French psychoanalyst Geza Roheim, who made the effort to verify on the anthropological fieldwork the solidity of Freud's psychoanalytical vision of magic.
First, while Lydgate was clearly not shy when it came to asserting his authorship--indeed, he names himself in more texts than any other Middle English writer (3)--I am keen to register that it is the continuator of the Secrees, not Lydgate himself, who identifies Lydgate as the author of the text's opening section.
The continuator of this idea was Menniger who, in his Man against Himself, starting from ideas of pulsions, saw a crime in the suicide, namely, the wish to kill is reversed and turned through external conjunctures against one's own person.
The land, nature itself, takes revenge on the elder Morgan when his son, his continuator, is drowned in a river swollen by the rain that is so characteristic of the glen.