contraindicated


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con·tra·in·di·cate

 (kŏn′trə-ĭn′dĭ-kāt′)
tr.v. con·tra·in·di·cat·ed, con·tra·in·di·cat·ing, con·tra·in·di·cates
To indicate the inadvisability of (a medical treatment, for example).

con′tra·in·dic′a·tive (-ĭn-dĭk′ə-tĭv) adj.

contraindicated

(ˌkɒntrəˈɪndɪˌkeɪtɪd)
adj
(Medicine) med not advisable because of contraindications
Translations

contraindicated

a. contraindicado-a.

contraindicated

adj contraindicado
References in periodicals archive ?
Caldolor is contraindicated in patients with known hypersensitivity to ibuprofen or other NSAIDs, patients with a history of asthma or other allergic type reactions after taking aspirin or other NSAIDs.
It is contraindicated, especially near term (it has oxytocic properties), and the animal data suggest risk of IUGR.
Immediate dentures are contraindicated in patients in which multiple extractions cannot be done because of systemic conditions such as cardiac disturbances, endocrine gland disorders, blood dyscrasias, and those with a slow healing potential.
A total of 491 patients were taking a contraindicated statin or a statin at too high a dose to be safe, given the other medications they were on.
Immunization is contraindicated for pregnant or immunosuppressed persons.
The information like effects on ability to drive and use machines if contraindicated and antidote for overdosing were present in only 19% and 39% of PIs.
This study aimed at assessment of the awareness and knowledge of the Sudanese community pharmacists about contraindicated drugs for asthmatic patients.
This suggests that an adequate blood astaxanthin status is needed to protect against tumor initiation; conversely, astaxanthin supplementation after tumor initiation may be contraindicated.
"(Sex) is not contraindicated as long as the BP is controlled.
Since that time it has been claimed that the phytoestrogen (isoflavone) content may be contraindicated for women with breast cancer or at high risk of breast cancer.
One of the study's authors, Antonio Nicolucci, MD, asserts that the research contraindicated the use of aspirin for that purpose except where significant cardiovascular risk factors were involved: "If the risk of having a cardiovascular event is low, then the risk of bleeding will likely offset any beneficial effect of aspirin." Not all clinicians agree; in commenting on the study, Jolatna Siller-Matula, MD, says that "The net benefit of aspirin for secondary prevention would substantially exceed the bleeding hazard." More clinicians are weighing in on an ongoing controversy whose fires will only be fueled by the JAMA study.