contralto

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con·tral·to

 (kən-trăl′tō)
n. pl. con·tral·tos Music
1. The lowest female voice or voice part, intermediate in range between soprano and tenor.
2. A woman having a contralto voice.

[Italian : contra-, below (from Latin contrā-, contra-) + alto, alto; see alto.]

contralto

(kənˈtræltəʊ; -ˈtrɑːl-)
n, pl -tos or -ti (-tɪ)
1. (Music, other) the lowest female voice, usually having a range of approximately from F a fifth below middle C to D a ninth above it. In the context of a choir often shortened to: alto
2. (Music, other) a singer with such a voice
adj
(Music, other) of or denoting a contralto: the contralto part.
[C18: from Italian; see contra-, alto]

con•tral•to

(kənˈtræl toʊ)

n., pl. -tos.
1. the lowest female voice or voice part, intermediate between soprano and tenor.
2. a singer with a contralto voice.
[1720–30; < Italian, =contr(a) contra-2 + alto alto]

contralto

The lowest range of any female voice.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.contralto - a woman singer having a contralto voicecontralto - a woman singer having a contralto voice
singer, vocalist, vocalizer, vocaliser - a person who sings
2.contralto - the lowest female singing voicecontralto - the lowest female singing voice  
singing voice - the musical quality of the voice while singing
Adj.1.contralto - of or being the lowest female voicecontralto - of or being the lowest female voice
low-pitched, low - used of sounds and voices; low in pitch or frequency

contralto

adjective
Being a sound produced by a relatively small frequency of vibrations:
Translations

contralto

[kənˈtræltəʊ]
A. N (contraltos or contralti (pl)) [kənˈtræltɪ] (= person) → contralto f
B. CPD [voice] → de contralto

contralto

[kənˈtrɑːltəʊ]
n
(= singer) → contralto m
(= voice) → contralto m
modif [voice] → de contralto; [part, aria] → pour contralto

contralto

n (= voice)Alt m; (= singer also)Altist(in) m(f)
adj voiceAlt-; the contralto partdie Altstimme, der Alt

contralto

[kənˈtræltəʊ] ncontralto
References in classic literature ?
She sat entranced through `Robin Hood' and hung upon the lips of the contralto who sang, `Oh, Promise Me
He read of the swallows that fly in and out of the little cafe at Smyrna where the Hadjis sit counting their amber beads and the turbaned merchants smoke their long tasselled pipes and talk gravely to each other; he read of the Obelisk in the Place de la Concorde that weeps tears of granite in its lonely sunless exile and longs to be back by the hot, lotus-covered Nile, where there are Sphinxes, and rose-red ibises, and white vultures with gilded claws, and crocodiles with small beryl eyes that crawl over the green steaming mud; he began to brood over those verses which, drawing music from kiss-stained marble, tell of that curious statue that Gautier compares to a contralto voice, the "monstre charmant" that couches in the porphyry-room of the Louvre.
the Bass and Tenor of the Man and the Soprano and Contralto of the two Women?
cried she, with her finest contralto voice, and rapping at the window.
All I know is that one evening, entering incautiously the salon of the little house just after the news of a considerable Carlist success had reached the faithful, I was seized round the neck and waist and whirled recklessly three times round the room, to the crash of upsetting furniture and the humming of a valse tune in a warm contralto voice.
Lastly, her feet and hands were astonishing, and her voice a deep contralto.
rang out the clear contralto notes of her childish voice, audible the whole length of the table.