contrariness


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con·trar·y

 (kŏn′trĕr′ē)
adj.
1. Opposed, as in character or purpose: contrary opinions; acts that are contrary to our code of ethics.
2. Opposite in direction or position: Our boat took a course contrary to theirs. See Synonyms at opposite.
3. Music Moving in the opposite direction at a fixed interval: playing scales in contrary motion.
4. Adverse; unfavorable: a contrary wind.
5. (also kən-trâr′ē) Given to recalcitrant behavior; willful or perverse.
n. pl. con·trar·ies
1. Something that is opposite or contrary.
2. Either of two opposing or contrary things: "Truth is perhaps ... a dynamic compound of opposites, savage contraries for a moment conjoined" (A. Bartlett Giamatti).
3. Logic A proposition related to another in such a way that if the latter is true, the former must be false, but if the latter is false, the former is not necessarily true.
adv.
In an opposite direction or manner; counter: The judge ruled contrary to all precedent in the case.
Idioms:
by contraries Obsolete
In opposition to what is expected.
on the contrary
In opposition to what has been stated or what is expected: I'm not sick; on the contrary, I'm in the peak of health.
to the contrary
To the opposite effect from what has been stated or what is expected: Despite what you say to the contrary, this contract is fair.

[Middle English contrarie, from Anglo-Norman, from Latin contrārius : contrā, against; see kom in Indo-European roots + -ārius, -ary.]

con′trar′i·ly (kŏn′trĕr′ə-lē, kən-trâr′-) adv.
con′trar′i·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.contrariness - deliberate and stubborn unruliness and resistance to guidance or discipline
fractiousness, unruliness, wilfulness, willfulness - the trait of being prone to disobedience and lack of discipline
cussedness, orneriness - meanspirited disagreeable contrariness
2.contrariness - a fussy and eccentric disposition
ill nature - a disagreeable, irritable, or malevolent disposition

contrariness

noun
Translations
تَناقُض، تَعاكُس
paličatost
modvillighedtværhedvrangvillighed
ellenállásellentmondásra való hajlam
òvermóîska

contrariness

[kənˈtrɛərɪnɪs] N (= perverseness) → terquedad f

contrariness

nWiderborstigkeit f; (of person also) → Widerspruchsgeist m; (of horse) → Widerspenstigkeit f

contrariness

[kənˈtrɛərɪnɪs] ntestardaggine f, cocciutaggine f

contrary2

(kənˈtreəri) adjective
obstinate; unreasonable.
conˈtrariness noun
References in classic literature ?
She folded herself in the large chair, and leaned her head against it in fatigued quiescence, while Tantripp went away wondering at this strange contrariness in her young mistress--that just the morning when she had more of a widow's face than ever, she should have asked for her lighter mourning which she had waived before.
Something of her contrariness came back to her as she paced the walk and looked over it at the tree-tops inside.
But her beauty, which was radiant in the morning light, took the contrariness from her words.
She was also tiny, Italian, extremely temperamental, and fond, with characteristic contrariness, of both the Rolling Stones and shrill tarantella, to both of which she would dance around her small kitchen in the port town, forgetting her prosthetic hip and high blood pressure, throwing her arms up in the air and laughing like a fresh bride.
Schuyler, in particular, was the king of contrariness.
To Fallaci, the craft of journalism demanded contrariness.
But then, contrariness and not doing what the audience expect has been the hallmark of Dylan ever since he plugged in and went "electric" in the mid-60s, provoking that famous cry of "Judas
As the International Institute for Strategic Studies coyly put it after the Tomahawk strike: "If it appears that Trump is on the way to reaching an appropriate policy equilibrium, his impulsiveness, ignorance of international affairs, unsystematic nature, native contrariness and 'transactional' disposition probably preclude the coalescence of a distinctive 'Trump doctrine.
Perhaps, contrariness is a programmed characteristic of the human psyche, energizing us away from the static perfection of apiculture, and giving us an evolutionary edge over the beaver, who seems to have settled on the talent of building earthen dams.
Here, Guillon's staunch contrariness is most openly evident, but his refusal to grieve in any way for the death of a libertarian and anticlerical artist like Cabu may appear callow.
Rankin's fondness for overwriting aside, Joan Littlewood: Dreams and Realities is essential reading as a reminder of a one-off firebrand whose like hasn't come our way since, even if Littlewood's contrariness and obstinacy leap off the page scarcely less vividly than the self-evident passion she brought to her peppery, populist art.