controversial

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con·tro·ver·sial

 (kŏn′trə-vûr′shəl, -sē-əl)
adj.
1. Of, producing, or marked by controversy: a controversial movie; a controversial stand on human rights.
2. Fond of controversy; disputatious.

con′tro·ver′sial·ist n.
con′tro·ver′si·al′i·ty (-shē-ăl′ĭ-tē, -sē-) n.
con′tro·ver′sial·ly adv.

con•tro•ver•sial

(ˌkɒn trəˈvɜr ʃəl, -si əl)

adj.
1. of, characterized by, or subject to controversy: a controversial decision.
2. given to controversy; disputatious.
[1575–85; < Late Latin]
con`tro•ver′sial•ism, n.
con`tro•ver′sial•ist, n.
con`tro•ver′sial•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.controversial - marked by or capable of arousing controversy; "the issue of the death penalty is highly controversial"; "Rushdie's controversial book"; "a controversial decision on affirmative action"
noncontroversial, uncontroversial - not likely to arouse controversy

controversial

adjective disputed, contended, contentious, at issue, debatable, polemic, under discussion, open to question, hot-button (informal), disputable Immigration is a controversial issue in many countries.
Translations
جَدَليجَدَلِيّ
kontroverznísporný
kontroversiel
kiistanalainen
kontroverzanprijeporan
vitatott
umdeildur
論争の
논쟁의
sporen
kontroversiell
ซึ่งก่อให้เกิดการโต้แย้ง
gây tranh cãi

controversial

[ˌkɒntrəˈvɜːʃəl] ADJcontrovertido, polémico
euthanasia is a controversial subjectla eutanasia es un tema controvertido or polémico

controversial

[ˌkɒntrəˈvɜːrʃəl] adj
[issue, plan] → discutable, controversé(e); [decision] → controversé(e); [circumstances] → discutable
[figure] → discuté(e)
[book, film] → controversé(e)
a controversial book → un livre controversé

controversial

adj speech, person, figure etckontrovers; (= debatable) matter, decision alsoumstritten, strittig; it is still controversial whether …es ist immer noch umstritten, ob …; he is deliberately controversialer gibt sich bewusst kontrovers

controversial

[ˌkɒntrəˈvɜːʃl] adj (subject, speech, decision, book) → controverso/a, discusso/a, che suscita polemiche; (person) → discusso/a, polemico/a

controversy

(kənˈtrovəsi) , (ˈkontrəvəːsi) plural controversies noun
(an) argument between opposing points of view. the controversy over the appointment of the new chairman.
controversial (kontrəˈvəːʃəl) adjective
causing controversy. His new book is very controversial.
ˌcontroˈversially adverb

controversial

جَدَلِيّ kontroverzní kontroversiel umstritten αμφιλεγόμενος polémico kiistanalainen polémique prijeporan controverso 論争の 논쟁의 controversieel kontroversiell kontrowersyjny controverso спорный kontroversiell ซึ่งก่อให้เกิดการโต้แย้ง tartışmalı gây tranh cãi 有争议的

controversial

adj controvertido
References in classic literature ?
controversialists who are more concerned to deprive the world of
They are like two controversialists hurling words at one another.
Chesterton set the whole world laughing with a series of alleged non-partisan essays on the subject, and the whole affair, controversy and controversialists, was well-nigh swept into the pit by a thundering broadside from George Bernard Shaw.
The vicar of their pleasant rural parish was not a controversialist, but a good hand at whist, and one who had a joke always ready for a blooming female parishioner.
In 1526 William Tyndale, a zealous Protestant controversialist then in exile in Germany, published an excellent English translation of the New Testament.
It is a superb book, full of relentless data and insightful analysis, making it an invaluable resource for teachers and controversialists.
France's great 17th-century scientist, Rene Descartes, had said nothing about the planet's outline, but because it takes a horse to beat a horse, French controversialists turned to him anyway, deducing from Descartes' writing that the shape was a thick tube, long and straight, more like a Japanese eggplantthan a tomato.
Having laid so much responsibility at the door of fiery evangelical controversialists, however, Doyle takes an unusual turn in his discussion of Belfast Catholicism during the same period.
Assuming their modern form in the 18th century, pamphlets allowed controversialists to enter the public sphere to engage controversy.
Intolerance, persecution, and proselytism are invidious and ill-sounding terms, never long absent from the mouths of anti-Catholic controversialists.
Another matter of interest uncovered by the author is the extensive use of history and precedent by the competing controversialists, particularly exemplified by the importance given to a few passages in St.