convalescence


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con·va·les·cence

 (kŏn′və-lĕs′əns)
n.
1. Gradual return to health and strength after illness.
2. The period needed for returning to health after illness.

con′va·les′cent adj. & n.

convalescence

(ˌkɒnvəˈlɛsəns) or

convalescency

n
1. (Medicine) gradual return to health after illness, injury, or an operation, esp through rest
2. (Medicine) the period during which such recovery occurs
ˌconvaˈlescent n, adj
ˌconvaˈlescently adv

con•va•les•cence

(ˌkɒn vəˈlɛs əns)

n.
1. the gradual recovery of health and strength after illness.
2. the period during which one is convalescing.
[1480–90; < Late Latin]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.convalescence - gradual healing (through rest) after sickness or injury
healing - the natural process by which the body repairs itself
lysis - recuperation in which the symptoms of an acute disease gradually subside
rally - a marked recovery of strength or spirits during an illness

convalescence

noun recovery, rehabilitation, recuperation, return to health, improvement He was home for three weeks' convalescence after a bout of jaundice.
Translations
نَقاهَة، تَماثُل لِلشِّفاء
rekonvalescence
bedringrekonvalescens
GenesungRekonvaleszenzRekonvaleszenzzeit
lábadozás
bati; afturbataskeiî
rekonvalescencia

convalescence

[ˌkɒnvəˈlesəns] Nconvalecencia f

convalescence

[ˌkɒnvəˈlɛsəns] n (from illness)convalescence f

convalescence

nGenesung f; (= period)Genesungszeit f

convalescence

[ˌkɒnvəˈlɛsns] nconvalescenza

convalesce

(konvəˈles) verb
to recover health and strength after an illness. He is convalescing in the country.
ˌconvaˈlescent noun
a person who is recovering from an illness. Convalescents often need a special diet.
adjective
1. recovering health and strength after illness.
2. for convalescents. a convalescent home.
ˌconvaˈlescence noun

con·va·les·cence

n. convalecencia, proceso de restablecimiento, estado de recuperación, después de una enfermedad o lesión.

convalescence

n convalecencia
References in classic literature ?
And of my own knowledge I know that when consciousness returned with convalescence I sent for the clerk of the hotel.
The Vicar, notwithstanding medical assurance that the boy was no longer infectious, received him with suspicion; he thought it very inconsiderate of the doctor to suggest that his nephew's convalescence should be spent by the seaside, and consented to have him in the house only because there was nowhere else he could go.
Toward morning all these dreams melted and merged into the chaos and darkness of unconciousness and oblivion which in the opinion of Napoleon's doctor, Larrey, was much more likely to end in death than in convalescence.
Constitutional laziness, in some young ladies, assumes an invalid character, and presents the interesting spectacle of perpetual convalescence. The doctor declared that the baths at St.
Anne's convalescence was long, and made bitter for her by many things.
But now that he had apparently made every preparation for death; now that his coffin was proved a good fit, Queequeg suddenly rallied; soon there seemed no need of the carpenter's box: and thereupon, when some expressed their delighted surprise, he, in substance, said, that the cause of his sudden convalescence was this; --at a critical moment, he had just recalled a little duty ashore, which he was leaving undone; and therefore had changed his mind about dying: he could not die yet, he averred.
Since my convalescence I have so many affairs of this kind on my hands that I am forced to regulate them a little.
I was a very constant and attentive visitor to him throughout the whole period of his illness and convalescence; not only from the interest I took in his recovery, and my desire to cheer him up and make the utmost possible amends for my former 'brutality,' but from my growing attachment to himself, and the increasing pleasure I found in his society - partly from his increased cordiality to me, but chiefly on account of his close connection, both in blood and in affection, with my adored Helen.
That I have to sing once more--THAT consolation did I devise for myself, and THIS convalescence: would ye also make another lyre-lay thereof?"
Dunster, in this first stage of his convalescence, was perhaps difficult to please, for he did not like the look of the doctor, either.
The bright sun, the brilliant green of the foliage, the strains of the music were for her the natural setting of all these familiar faces, with their changes to greater emaciation or to convalescence, for which she watched.
It was a divine spring, and the season contributed greatly to my convalescence. I felt also sentiments of joy and affection revive in my bosom; my gloom disappeared, and in a short time I became as cheerful as before I was attacked by the fatal passion.