conveniency

(redirected from conveniencies)

con·ven·ien·cy

 (kən-vēn′yən-sē)
n. pl. con·ven·ien·cies Archaic
Convenience.

conveniency

(kənˈviːnɪənsɪ)
n
obsolete convenience
References in periodicals archive ?
Thus Vice nurs'd Ingenuity, Which joyn'd with Time and Industry, Had carry'd Life's Conveniencies, Its real Pleasures, Comforts, Ease, To such a Height, the very Poor Liv'd better than the Rich before, And nothing could be added more.
Thus, when John Locke traces the moral foundations of property in his Second Treatise, he insisted that God gave the world "to the use of the industrious and rational, (and labour was to be his title to it)," and that "[t] he measure of property, nature has well set, by the extent of mens labour, and the conveniencies of life.
The desire of becoming the proper objects of this respect, of deserving and obtaining this credit and rank among our equals, is, perhaps, the strongest of all our desires, and our anxiety to obtain the advantages of fortune is accordingly much more excited and irritated by this desire, than by that of supplying all the necessities and conveniencies of the body, which are always very easily supplied.
a fruitful soil, apt to produce in abundance, what might serve for food, raiment, and delight; yet for want of improving it by labour, have not one hundredth part of the conveniencies we enjoy: and a king of a large and fruitful territory there, feeds, lodges, and is clad worse than a day-labourer in England.
Because Indians refused to engage in commercial agriculture, they "have not one hundredth part of the Conveniencies we enjoy: And a King of a large and fruitful territory there feeds, lodges, and is clad worse than a day labourer in England.
The outer one composed the kitchen, in a corner of which they spread a mat for us on the floor; and in this generally consisted of all the conveniencies [sic] the good folks could afford us.
Now, as these circumstances and exigencies, and conveniencies insensibly
with his wife and family, consisting of a son of twelve years old, a daughter of fourteen, two maid servants, a female negro slave, and George Pine his book-keeper, on board one of the said ships, called the East India Merchant, of four hundred and fifty tons, being provided with all manner of necessaries and conveniencies, in order to settle a factory there.
But she expressed her pleasant surprise at finding "so many conveniencies in the kitchen, parlour and hall, considering it was till now only occupied by a bachelor".
Fanny can only assume that the conveniencies were not accepted if Charles has told her so, and Cleland provides details that render that assumption dubitable.