conventionalism


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con·ven·tion·al

 (kən-vĕn′shə-nəl)
adj.
1. Based on or in accordance with general agreement, use, or practice; customary: conventional symbols; a conventional form of address.
2. Conforming to established practice or accepted standards; traditional: a conventional church wedding.
3.
a. Devoted to or bound by conventions to the point of artificiality; ceremonious.
b. Unimaginative; conformist: longed to escape from their conventional, bourgeois lives.
4. Represented, as in a work of art, in simplified or abstract form.
5. Law Based on consent or agreement; contractual.
6. Of, relating to, or resembling an assembly.
7. Using means other than nuclear weapons or energy: conventional warfare; conventional power plants.

con·ven′tion·al·ism n.
con·ven′tion·al·ist n.
con·ven′tion·al·ly adv.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

conventionalism

(kənˈvɛnʃənəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. advocacy of or conformity to that which is established
2. something conventional
3. (Philosophy) philosophy a theory that moral principles are not enshrined in the nature of things but merely reflect customary practice
4. (Philosophy) philosophy the theory that meaning is a matter of convention and thus that scientific laws merely reflect such general linguistic agreement
conˈventionalist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

conventionalism

a variety of conduct and thought based solely upon the usages, opinions, and practices of one’s own society. — conventionalist, n.
See also: Attitudes
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.conventionalism - orthodoxy as a consequence of being conventional
orthodoxy - the quality of being orthodox (especially in religion)
ossification, conformity - hardened conventionality
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

conventionalism

[kənˈvenʃənəlɪzəm] Nconvencionalismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005
References in classic literature ?
The worthy magistrate who had been conversant with all degrees and qualities of mankind, could not but perceive every motion and gesture of the distinguished Feathertop came in its proper place; nothing had been left rude or native in him; a well-digested conventionalism had incorporated itself thoroughly with his substance and transformed him into a work of art.
Her friendliness, and utter unreserve, took me aback for a moment; yet there was no touch of forwardness, or boldness, about the child for child, almost, she seemed to be: I guessed her at scarcely over twenty--all was the innocent frankness of some angelic visitant, new to the ways of earth and the conventionalisms or, if you will, the barbarisms--of Society.
Their topics include whether entailments can be implicatures, trying to make sense of embedded conversational implicatures, negotiating what is said in the face of miscommunication, accommodation in linguistic interaction: on the so-called triggering problem, expressive meanings and expressive commitments: a case of meaning as use, and temperate semantic conventionalism. (Ringgold, Inc., Portland, OR)
(Later) the elitist ideology and status attached to English by the ruling class kept English at the dominating level, and Urdu started to recede and began to be associated with the concepts of religious fundamentalism and conventionalism.'
The appeal of Moby-Dick for these illustrators lay in the possibility of recasting it as boys' adventure fiction, and they emphasised the heroic conventionalism of its characters and events.
"Promising, Intimate Relationships, and Conventionalism." Philosophical Review 117, no.
Underneath this set of guidelines is a recurring theme that conventionalism is the death of everything: business, wealth, innovation, creativity.
Strauss opts for what he calls "a safe middle road" between Averroes's moral conventionalism and Thomas's quasi-philosophical rigidity.
In particular, taking ordinary objects to be modally fine-grained plays a central role in leading Sidelle to endorse modal conventionalism, Korman to endorse rationalism, Thomasson to endorse a heavily intentional account of language, and Heller and van Inwagen to endorse eliminativism about ordinary objects.
As many have noted, the sophist's conventionalism, which denies humanity a political nature and denigrates virtue, is an important link between sophistry and modern thought.