convergent evolution


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convergent evolution

conver′gent evolu′tion


n.
the evolution of apparently similar structures in organisms of different lines of descent.
[1965–70]

convergent evolution

Evolution of similar features in unrelated organisms as adaptations to similar lifestyles, e.g. wings in birds and bats.
References in periodicals archive ?
It is widely accepted that some unrelated plants exhibit similar characteristics under similar environmental conditions, a process known as convergent evolution," said the co-author.
Divergent and convergent evolution in metastases suggest treatment strategies based on specific metastatic sites.
Acceptance of convergent evolution and directional selection within "created kinds" has risen in the twenty-first century among CS authors.
It would not be the first time that species in different evolutionary lines separately evolved similar characteristics, a phenomenon known as convergent evolution.
Then they took the research a step further and asked whether these mutations could explain a known convergent evolution event.
WRS also links its living collection with dinosaurs through the Same Same But Different trail, a feature on convergent evolution.
The book then reaches gradually backwards in time, discussing how bipedalism moved us out of the trees and onto the savannahs; convergent evolution of different classes of flying animals; the influence of swimming on the development of vertebrate organization and fins-to-limbs; how animals' needs for movement logically produced a head-to-tail axis and widespread bilateral symmetry; and even how the advent of a complex centralized nervous system developed in service to locomotion.
Marsupials provide the best-known examples of convergent evolution, and they include some species found in this remarkable radiation that have no counterparts anywhere in the world.
Relicanthus daphneae is a classic example of convergent evolution, the independent evolution of similar features in species of different lineages.
As monotocous and polytocous species are not monophyletic, the inference of episodic evolutionary history from which their traits formed through convergent evolution is somewhat complicated.
The answer lies in convergent evolution - when almost identical features or developments happen in different species.
Convergent evolution is less of a problem in trees that are based on genetic evidence, Springer says.