conversate

con·ver·sate

 (kŏn′vûr-sāt′)
intr.v. con·ver·sat·ed, con·ver·sat·ing, con·ver·sates Nonstandard
To converse.

[Back-formation from conversation.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
The stadiums look unbelievable and the people are doing a lot of work to conversate with the fans coming over.
"This government has made it distinctly clear that it does not want to conversate," he added.
Dubbed Die With Me, it allows users who have less than 5% of battery juice to enter a chat room and conversate while their phones are dying a slow and painful death.
They would be like ghosts in our fact, not being prepared to touch whatever, relocate whatever, conversate with any individual.
What makes it different is that Hala and Dounia conversate in English/Arabic but sing in Arabic.
Split up by the barriers called languages, we fail to conversate love.
I could always talk real good, and come to think of it, I could conversate with just about anybody.
There's nodebate, conversate with your mate/And don't wait until it's too late." Magic Johnson, who announced he was HIV-positive in 1991, appeared on Arsenio in 1992 and implored sexually active teenagers to be safe.
Fancy substitutes such as "incentivise" pointlessly elbow the perfectly satisfactory "reward", but worse still is "conversate" instead of talk.