convivial


Also found in: Thesaurus.

con·viv·i·al

 (kən-vĭv′ē-əl)
adj.
1. Enjoying good company; sociable. See Synonyms at social.
2. Characterized by merry celebrating; festive: a convivial atmosphere at the reunion.

[Late Latin convīviālis, from Latin convīvium, banquet : com-, com- + vīvere, to live; see gwei- in Indo-European roots.]

con·viv′i·al′i·ty (-ăl′ĭ-tē) n.
con·viv′i·al·ly adv.

convivial

(kənˈvɪvɪəl)
adj
sociable; jovial or festive: a convivial atmosphere.
[C17: from Late Latin convīviālis pertaining to a feast, from Latin convīvium, a living together, banquet, from vīvere to live]
conˈvivialist n
conˌviviˈality n
conˈvivially adv

con•viv•i•al

(kənˈvɪv i əl)

adj.
1. friendly; agreeable: a convivial atmosphere.
2. fond of feasting, drinking, and merry company; jovial.
3. of or befitting a feast; festive.
[1660–70; < Late Latin convīviālis festal = Latin convīvi(um) feast (convīv(ere) to live together, dine together]
con•viv`i•al′i•ty, n.
con•viv′i•al•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.convivial - occupied with or fond of the pleasures of good company; "a convivial atmosphere at the reunion"; "a woman of convivial nature"; "he was a real good-time Charlie"
sociable - inclined to or conducive to companionship with others; "a sociable occasion"; "enjoyed a sociable chat"; "a sociable conversation"; "Americans are sociable and gregarious"

convivial

adjective sociable, friendly, lively, cheerful, jolly, merry, festive, hearty, genial, fun-loving, jovial, back-slapping, gay, partyish (informal) Enjoy simple but satisfying food in the bistro's convivial atmosphere.

convivial

adjective
1. Liking company:
Chiefly British: matey.
2. Characterized by joyful exuberance:
3. Spent, marked by, or enjoyed in the company of others:
Translations
žoviální
gemytlig
geselligkonvivial
félagslyndur
šventiška nuotaikašventiškai
jautrsomulīgs
žoviálny

convivial

[kənˈvɪvɪəl] ADJ [person, company] → sociable, agradable; [evening, atmosphere] → alegre, agradable

convivial

[kənˈvɪvɪəl] adj [person, company] → plein(e) d'entrain; [occasion, atmosphere, evening] → convivial(e)

convivial

adjheiter und unbeschwert; person alsofröhlich; (= sociable)gesellig

convivial

[kənˈvɪvɪəl] adjallegro/a, gioviale

convivial

(kənˈviviəl) adjective
pleasantly sociable and friendly.
conˈvivially adverb
conˌviviˈality (-ˈӕ-) noun
References in classic literature ?
He seemed, indeed, singularly fond of his own company--or, as the PERSONNEL of the Advance expressed it, "grossly addicted to evil associations." But then it should be said in justice to the stranger that the PERSONNEL was himself of a too convivial disposition fairly to judge one differently gifted, and had, moreover, experienced a slight rebuff in an effort at an "interview."
It is a most refreshing, convivial, beautiful object to behold.
When my convivial host discovered that he had told me so much, and that I was prone to doubtfulness, his foolish pride assumed the task the old vintage had commenced, and so he unearthed written evidence in the form of musty manuscript, and dry official records of the British Colonial Office to support many of the salient features of his remarkable narrative.
Just to think of a party of these unnatural gourmands taking it into their heads to make a convivial meal of a poor devil, who would have no means of escape or defence: however, there was no help for it.
After my long sickness my drinking continued to be convivial. I drank when others drank and I was with them.
'You are a most convivial fellow,' returned his friend, 'and I love your humour of all things.
He was a convivial-looking party, with a red moustache, and a very humorous face (not unlike Tom Emmett's), and from that moment I laid myself out to attack him on his convivial flank.
How could he forget that in his Island days, Queequeg, for one, must certainly have been guilty of some murderous, convivial indiscretions.
Exceedingly red-eyed and grim, as if he had been up all night at a party which had taken anything but a convivial turn, Jerry Cruncher worried his breakfast rather than ate it, growling over it like any four-footed inmate of a menagerie.
La Ramee became, therefore, the duke's dinner guest by compulsion -- an eternal keeper, the shadow of his person; but La Ramee -- gay, frank, convivial, fond of play, a great hand at tennis, had one defect in the duke's eyes -- his incorruptibility.
I went to my club, and joined a convivial party at a supper table, and poured glass after glass of champagne down my throat, without feeling the slightest sense of exhilaration, without losing for an instant the consciousness of my own contemptible conduct.
Spirits were produced, in consequence of one of the young ladies complaining of a coldness in her inside; and the conversation took a very convivial and improving turn.