cooked


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Related to cooked: cooked up

cook

 (ko͝ok)
v. cooked, cook·ing, cooks
v.tr.
1. To prepare (food) for eating by applying heat.
2. To prepare or treat by heating: slowly cooked the medicinal mixture.
3. Slang To alter or falsify so as to make a more favorable impression; doctor: disreputable accountants who were paid to cook the firm's books.
v.intr.
1. To prepare food for eating by applying heat.
2. To undergo application of heat especially for the purpose of later ingestion.
3. Slang To happen, develop, or take place: What's cooking in town?
4. Slang To proceed or perform very well: The band really got cooking after midnight.
n.
A person who prepares food for eating.
Phrasal Verb:
cook up Informal
To fabricate; concoct: cook up an excuse.
Idiom:
cook (one's) goose Slang
To ruin one's chances: The speeding ticket cooked his goose with his father. Her goose was cooked when she was caught cheating on the test.

[Middle English coken, from coke, cook, from Old English cōc, from Vulgar Latin *cōcus, from Latin cocus, coquus, from coquere, to cook; see pekw- in Indo-European roots.]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.cooked - having been prepared for eating by the application of heat
raw - not treated with heat to prepare it for eating
Translations
főtt
kuhan

cooked

[kʊkt]
A. ADJ [breakfast] → caliente
B. CPD cooked meats NPLfiambres fpl

cooked

a. cocinado-a; guisado-a;
well ___bien ___.
References in classic literature ?
She boiled the asparagus for an hour and was grieved to find the heads cooked off and the stalks harder than ever.
With her own hands Louise Hardy bathed his tired young body and cooked him food.
For once it was dead, game did not keep well in that hot climate, and needed to be cooked almost immediately.
Madame Antoine had cooked little else than the mullets, but while Edna slept Robert had foraged the island.
It was after a great feast given by his father the king, on the gaining of a great battle wherein fifty of the enemy had been killed by about two o'clock in the afternoon, and all cooked and eaten that very evening.
The packers were always originating such schemes--they had what they called "boneless hams," which were all the odds and ends of pork stuffed into casings; and "California hams," which were the shoulders, with big knuckle joints, and nearly all the meat cut out; and fancy "skinned hams," which were made of the oldest hogs, whose skins were so heavy and coarse that no one would buy them--that is, until they had been cooked and chopped fine and labeled "head cheese
Everything went on so sociably, so quietly, so harmoniously, in the great kitchen,--it seemed so pleasant to every one to do just what they were doing, there was such an atmosphere of mutual confidence and good fellowship everywhere,--even the knives and forks had a social clatter as they went on to the table; and the chicken and ham had a cheerful and joyous fizzle in the pan, as if they rather enjoyed being cooked than otherwise;--and when George and Eliza and little Harry came out, they met such a hearty, rejoicing welcome, no wonder it seemed to them like a dream.
At noon we stepped ashore and bought some bottled beer and got some chickens cooked, while the raft waited; then we immediately put to sea again, and had our dinner while the beer was cold and the chickens hot.
When you got to the table you couldn't go right to eating, but you had to wait for the widow to tuck down her head and grumble a little over the victuals, though there warn't really anything the matter with them, -- that is, nothing only everything was cooked by itself.
They built a fire against the side of a great log twenty or thirty steps within the sombre depths of the forest, and then cooked some bacon in the frying-pan for sup- per, and used up half of the corn "pone" stock they had brought.
Your traps has been here ever so long, and I've had supper cooked fresh about four times so as to have it hot and good when you come, till at last my patience is just plumb wore out, and I declare I--I--why I could skin you alive
I wish your aunt Jane and me wasn't both so worthless with these colds; but it only shows the good of havin' a clean house, with every room in order, whether open or shut, and enough victuals cooked so 't you can't be surprised and belittled by anybody, whatever happens.