coolly


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cool

 (ko͞ol)
adj. cool·er, cool·est
1. Neither warm nor very cold; moderately cold: fresh, cool water; a cool autumn evening.
2. Giving or suggesting relief from heat: a cool breeze; a cool blouse.
3. Marked by calm self-control: a cool negotiator.
4. Marked by indifference, disdain, or dislike; unfriendly or unresponsive: a cool greeting; was cool to the idea of higher taxes.
5. Of, relating to, or characteristic of colors, such as blue and green, that produce the impression of coolness.
6. Slang
a. Knowledgeable or aware of the latest trends or developments: spent all his time trying to be cool.
b. Excellent; first-rate: has a cool sports car; had a cool time at the party.
c. Acceptable; satisfactory: It's cool if you don't want to talk about it.
7. Slang Entire; full: worth a cool million.
adv.
Informal In a casual manner; nonchalantly: play it cool.
v. cooled, cool·ing, cools
v.tr.
1. To make less warm.
2. To make less ardent, intense, or zealous: problems that soon cooled my enthusiasm for the project.
3. Physics To reduce the molecular or kinetic energy of (an object).
v.intr.
1. To become less warm: took a dip to cool off.
2. To become calmer: needed time for tempers to cool.
n.
1. A cool place, part, or time: the cool of early morning.
2. The state or quality of being cool.
3. Composure; poise: "Our release marked a victory. The nation had kept its cool" (Moorhead Kennedy).
Idioms:
cool it Slang
1. To calm down; relax.
2. To stop doing something.
cool (one's) heels Informal
To wait or be kept waiting.

[Middle English cole, from Old English cōl; see gel- in Indo-European roots.]

cool′ish adj.
cool′ly adv.
cool′ness n.
Synonyms: cool, calm, composed, collected, imperturbable, nonchalant
These adjectives indicate absence of excitement or discomposure in a person, especially in times of stress. Cool usually implies an alert self-possession, but it may also indicate aloofness: "Keep strong, if possible. In any case, keep cool. Have unlimited patience" (B.H. Liddell Hart)."An honest hater is often a better fellow than a cool friend" (John Stuart Blackie).
Calm suggests a serenity achieved through mastery over agitation or inner turmoil: "It was like coming across a bear in the woods: you were supposed to stand still and remain calm, against every impulse" (Cheryl Strayed).
Composed and collected stress self-control brought about by mental concentration: The dancer was composed as she prepared for her recital. The witness remained collected throughout the questioning. Imperturbable and unruffled suggest equanimity in the face of potentially disturbing circumstances: The crises of 1837 shook his previously imperturbable composure (James A. Henretta).
Nonchalant describes a casual manner that may suggest either confidence or lack of concern: "the nonchalant way of loggers with regard to injuries" (Molly Gloss). See Also Synonyms at cold.
Our Living Language The usage of cool as a general positive epithet or interjection has been part and parcel of English slang since World War II, and has even been borrowed into other languages, such as French and German. Originally this sense is a development from its use in African American Vernacular English to mean "excellent, superlative," first recorded in written English in the early 1930s. Jazz musicians who used the term are responsible for its popularization during the 1940s. As a slang word expressing generally positive sentiment, it has stayed current (and cool) far longer than most such words. One of the main characteristics of slang is the continual renewal of its vocabulary and storehouse of expressions: in order for slang to stay slangy, it has to have a feeling of novelty. Slang expressions meaning the same thing as cool, like bully, capital, hot, groovy, hep, crazy, nervous, far-out, rad, tubular, def, and phat have for the most part not had the staying power or continued universal appeal of cool.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.coolly - in a composed and unconcerned manner; "without more ado Barker borrowed a knife from his brigade Major and honed it on a carborundum stone as coolly as a butcher"
Translations
بِـبُـرودَه
chladně
koldtkøligt
kuldalega
oldukça soğuk bir şekildesakin bir şekilde

coolly

[ˈkuːlɪ] ADV
1. (= calmly) [react, behave] → con serenidad, con sangre fría
he reacted coolly in the midst of the crisismostró mucha sangre fría en medio de la crisis
he very coolly put out his hand and picked up the snakecon una serenidad or con una sangre fría increíble alargó la mano y cogió la serpiente
2. (= unemotionally) [say, reply] → con tranquilidad, con sangre fría
she coolly denied everythingnegó todo con una sangre fría increíble
3. (pej) (= audaciously) → descaradamente, con mucha frescura
4. (= unenthusiastically) → fríamente, con frialdad

coolly

[ˈkuːlli] adv
(= calmly) [say, answer] → calmement
(= audaciously) [exploit] → sans scrupules; [premeditate] → froidement
(= unenthusiastically) → froidement

coolly

adv
(= calmly)ruhig, gefasst, besonnen
(= unenthusiastically, in an unfriendly way)kühl
(= audaciously)kaltblütig, unverfroren (pej), → kaltschnäuzig (inf)

coolly

[ˈkuːlɪ] adv (calmly) → con padronanza di sé; (audaciously) → come se niente fosse; (unenthusiastically) → freddamente

cool

(kuːl) adjective
1. slightly cold. cool weather.
2. calm or not excitable. He's very cool in a crisis.
3. not very friendly. He was very cool towards me.
4. (slang) great; terrific; fantastic. Wow, that's really cool!; You look cool in those jeans!
verb
1. to make or become less warm. The jelly will cool better in the refrigerator; She cooled her hands in the stream.
2. to become less strong. His affection for her has cooled; Her anger cooled.
noun
cool air or atmosphere. the cool of the evening.
ˈcoolly adverb
ˈcoolness noun
cool-ˈheaded adjective
able to act calmly.
cool down
1. to make or become less warm. Let your food cool down a bit!
2. to make or become less excited or less emotional. He was very angry but he's cooled down now.
keep one's cool
not to become over-excited or confused. If you keep your cool you won't fail.
lose one's cool
not to keep one's cool.
References in classic literature ?
Meg jumped up, looking both proud and shy, but `that man', as Jo called him, actually laughed and said coolly, as he kissed the astonished newcomer, "Sister Jo, congratulate us
All right,' he said coolly, took up his oil-can, and began to climb the mill.
Then Le Renard Subtil will go," returned the runner, coolly raising his little wallet from the place where it had lain at his feet; "and the pale faces will see none but their own color.
It will suit my purpose still better to see the original," replied the daguerreotypist coolly.
But that was certainly very coolly done by him, and every one knows that in most people's estimation, to do anything coolly is to do it genteelly.
I'd do it all the same to the writer of that ar paper, if he was here," said the long man, coolly resuming his old employment of cutting tobacco.
Then Tom turned coolly away, still talking, and took Amy with him.
I was surprised to witness how coolly the child gathered himself up, and went on with his intention; exchanging saddles and all, and then sitting down on a bundle of hay to overcome the qualm which the violent blow occasioned, before he entered the house.
How peculiar he was and how coolly he spoke of not living.
said Robin Hood; "for a man escaping the law, you took it about as coolly as one could wish.
When men exercise their reason coolly and freely on a variety of distinct questions, they inevitably fall into different opinions on some of them.
If it is for the purpose of rejoining Milady," said Athos, coolly, "it is useless; you will not find her.