cooter

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coot·er

 (ko͞o′tər)
n.
1. Lower Southern US
a. Any of several edible, freshwater turtles of the genus Pseudemys.
b. Any of various other turtles or tortoises.
2. Vulgar Slang The female genitalia.

[Gullah, probably of Niger-Congo origin; akin to Bambara and Malinke kuta.]

cooter

(ˈkuːtə)
n
(Animals) Southern US a large freshwater turtle, Pseudemus concinna, found in southern USA and northern Mexico

coot•er

(ˈku tər)

n.
any of several large freshwater turtles of the genus Chrysemys, of the S U.S., esp. C. floridana.
[1820–30, Amer.; said to be < Bambara, Malinke kuta turtle (with related forms in other Niger-Congo languages)]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cooter - large river turtle of the southern United States and northern Mexico
turtle - any of various aquatic and land reptiles having a bony shell and flipper-like limbs for swimming
genus Pseudemys, Pseudemys - sliders; red-bellied terrapin
References in periodicals archive ?
Cutcliffe was Tennessee quarterback coach during Cooters brief playing career, then worked alongside him when Cooter became a graduate assistant in 2007.
In yellow-bellied sliders (Trachemys scripta scripta), Florida cooters (Pseudemys floridana), and common mud turtles (Kinosternon subrubrum), last clutches have fewer eggs than clutches laid earlier (Gibbons et al.
Log House Hols, Gloucestershire 1 Looking Glass Cottage, E Sussex 2 ck ex Little Paddock cottage, Essex 3 Olney Cottage, Buckinghamshire 4 Eastwell Mews Cottages, Kent 5 Church Farm Oast South, Kent 6 Ghyll Cottage, West Sussex 7 The Granary, East Sussex 8 Westley Mill Barn, Berkshire 9 Cooters, Hampshire 10 The main Olympic stadium, Stratford
We have our own threatened sturgeons and sticklebacks, bog turtles and cooters, bats, whales, and dozens of other threatened species.
Sea-Doo Seas cooter GTI pounds 350 020 8752 1499, seas cooters.
Peninsula cooters are frequently seen basking on partially submerged logs, balanced on their belly plates with their legs outstretched.
For example, from 1995 to 1999 exports of softshell turtles (species of the genus Apalone) increased from 8,087 to 20,193; alligator snappers (Macroclemys) from 5,696 to 19,528; sliders (Trachemys) from 60,126 to 429,247; and cooters (Pseudemys) from 19,710 to 2,169,407.
On the front line there are three holes located along the top of the bluff 200 feet high overlooking Cooters Pond and the Alabama River.
Florida red-bellied turtles (Pseudemys nelsoni) are more resistant to disarticulation than peninsula cooters (Pseudemys floridana) probably because their high [equivalent to] domed shells are much thicker, possibly an adaptation against alligator attacks (Jackson, 1989).
1994), spiny softshell turtles, and eastern river cooters are listed as species of greatest conservation need in the crosstimbers and mixed-grass prairie ecoregions according to the oklahoma Wildlife Action plan (oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation, in litt.
Although Native Americans ate red-bellied cooters, their numbers are so low that it would be unconscionable to harvest them.
WESTBORO - You might think that with fewer than 2,000 or so northern red-bellied cooters in the wild in Massachusetts, it would be extremely hard to raise these turtles.