copiousness


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co·pi·ous

 (kō′pē-əs)
adj.
1. Yielding or containing plenty; affording ample supply: a copious harvest. See Synonyms at plentiful.
2. Large in quantity; abundant: copious rainfall.
3. Abounding in matter, thoughts, or words; wordy: "I found our speech copious without order, and energetic without rules" (Samuel Johnson).

[Middle English, from Latin cōpiōsus, from cōpia, abundance; see op- in Indo-European roots.]

co′pi·ous·ly adv.
co′pi·ous·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.copiousness - the property of a more than adequate quantity or supplycopiousness - the property of a more than adequate quantity or supply; "an age of abundance"
quantity - an adequate or large amount; "he had a quantity of ammunition"
bountifulness, bounty, amplitude - the property of copious abundance
plenitude, plenteousness, plentifulness, plentitude, plenty - a full supply; "there was plenty of food for everyone"
profuseness, profusion, richness, cornucopia - the property of being extremely abundant; "the profusion of detail"; "the idiomatic richness of English"
wealth - the quality of profuse abundance; "she has a wealth of talent"
lushness, luxuriance, voluptuousness - the property of being lush and abundant and a pleasure to the senses
overmuch, overmuchness, superabundance, overabundance - a quantity that is more than what is appropriate; "four-year-olds have an overabundance of energy"; "we received an inundation of email"
Translations
وَفْرَه، غَزارَه
bohatosthojnost
fyldighedrigelighed
gnægî
bollukçokluk

copiousness

n (of supply)Größe f, → Reichlichkeit f; (of information, details)Fülle f, → Reichtum m; (of writer)Fruchtbarkeit f

copious

(ˈkəupiəs) adjective
plentiful. a copious supply.
ˈcopiously adverb
ˈcopiousness noun
References in classic literature ?
I admire their polish -- their youth is already so accomplished that it seems absurd to speak of promise -- I marvel at the felicity of their style; but with all their copiousness (their vocabulary suggests that they fingered Roget's
By multipying the means of gratification, by promoting the introduction and circulation of the precious metals, those darling objects of human avarice and enterprise, it serves to vivify and invigorate the channels of industry, and to make them flow with greater activity and copiousness.
The major features of primary orality include the following: speech acts, mnemonic narrative devices, formulaic expressions and cliches, stock characters, standard themes, additive styles, redundancy and copiousness, an empathie audience relationship, and situational thinking (Ong 33-49).
The travel restrictions imposed on Qatar have further impacted these plans because it is estimated the country needs around 36,000 migrant labourers and copiousness amounts of imported construction materials to deliver on deadline.
like rhetoricians, the pastoral writers love to list and aim for copiousness, for representing, as much as possible, the culturally authoritative "dicta et facta" in a topos.
The chapter also proposes an epistemology of the conundrum of interpretation posed by mysterious, difficult, and obscure terms and their many possible meanings--as well as a set of guiding principles and strategies for scholars approaching the linguistic copiousness of sex discourse.
From a perspective of the conception of those songs, what Ong used to call redundancy or copiousness (and which I have called reiteration) is a necessary consequence of the oral economy, a pattern that the singer, poet or minstrel will keep in mind when he creates his poems.
that yet has been able to substitute for the substance so amazing a mockery, and has treated with so much copiousness and power what it was unfit ever to have attempted.
This implies the copiousness of workers to meet the factors' limited demand.
I believe that this insistence upon repetition and mundane copiousness illustrates a shift to highly individualized and often narcissistic attitudes that are becoming common in mobiliterates.
14) At that first meeting they argued amicably about whether it was better to be meagre and 'costive', as Davin called it, with one's writing, or to be for copiousness and fluency, as he believed he was himself.
The deliberateness with which Ashbery dutifully "turn[s]" his "gaze / Back to the instruction manual" in the poem's closing lines suggests that the career never lets him go, and the copiousness of the description of Guadalajara may itself be read as the result of a professional imperative to produce writing that follows him even into his dreams.