coppice


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cop·pice

 (kŏp′ĭs)
n.
A thicket or grove of small trees or shrubs, especially one maintained by periodic cutting or pruning to encourage suckering, as in the cultivation of cinnamon trees for their bark.
v. cop·piced, cop·pic·ing, cop·pic·es
v.tr.
To cut or prune (a tree) in making or maintaining a coppice.
v.intr.
To grow as a coppice after cutting. Used of trees.

[Old French copeiz; see copse.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

coppice

(ˈkɒpɪs)
n
(Forestry) a thicket or dense growth of small trees or bushes, esp one regularly trimmed back to stumps so that a continual supply of small poles and firewood is obtained
vb
1. (Forestry) (tr) to trim back (trees or bushes) to form a coppice
2. (Forestry) (intr) to form a coppice
[C14: from Old French copeiz, from couper to cut]
ˈcoppiced adj
ˈcoppicing n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

copse

(kɒps)

also coppice



n.
a thicket of small trees or bushes; a small wood.
[1570–80; alter. of coppice]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

coppice


Past participle: coppiced
Gerund: coppicing

Imperative
coppice
coppice
Present
I coppice
you coppice
he/she/it coppices
we coppice
you coppice
they coppice
Preterite
I coppiced
you coppiced
he/she/it coppiced
we coppiced
you coppiced
they coppiced
Present Continuous
I am coppicing
you are coppicing
he/she/it is coppicing
we are coppicing
you are coppicing
they are coppicing
Present Perfect
I have coppiced
you have coppiced
he/she/it has coppiced
we have coppiced
you have coppiced
they have coppiced
Past Continuous
I was coppicing
you were coppicing
he/she/it was coppicing
we were coppicing
you were coppicing
they were coppicing
Past Perfect
I had coppiced
you had coppiced
he/she/it had coppiced
we had coppiced
you had coppiced
they had coppiced
Future
I will coppice
you will coppice
he/she/it will coppice
we will coppice
you will coppice
they will coppice
Future Perfect
I will have coppiced
you will have coppiced
he/she/it will have coppiced
we will have coppiced
you will have coppiced
they will have coppiced
Future Continuous
I will be coppicing
you will be coppicing
he/she/it will be coppicing
we will be coppicing
you will be coppicing
they will be coppicing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been coppicing
you have been coppicing
he/she/it has been coppicing
we have been coppicing
you have been coppicing
they have been coppicing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been coppicing
you will have been coppicing
he/she/it will have been coppicing
we will have been coppicing
you will have been coppicing
they will have been coppicing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been coppicing
you had been coppicing
he/she/it had been coppicing
we had been coppicing
you had been coppicing
they had been coppicing
Conditional
I would coppice
you would coppice
he/she/it would coppice
we would coppice
you would coppice
they would coppice
Past Conditional
I would have coppiced
you would have coppiced
he/she/it would have coppiced
we would have coppiced
you would have coppiced
they would have coppiced
Collins English Verb Tables © HarperCollins Publishers 2011

coppice


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The pruning back to ground level each spring of decorative shrubs or trees to produce colorful stems or more attractive foliage.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.coppice - a dense growth of bushescoppice - a dense growth of bushes    
botany, flora, vegetation - all the plant life in a particular region or period; "Pleistocene vegetation"; "the flora of southern California"; "the botany of China"
brake - an area thickly overgrown usually with one kind of plant
canebrake - a dense growth of cane (especially giant cane)
spinney - a copse that shelters game
underbrush, undergrowth, underwood - the brush (small trees and bushes and ferns etc.) growing beneath taller trees in a wood or forest
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

coppice

[ˈkɒpɪs] Nsoto m, bosquecillo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

coppice

[ˈkɒpɪs] ntaillis m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

coppice

[ˈkɒpɪs] copse [kɒps] nbosco ceduo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
However it was, no one from the Poyser family went to church that afternoon except Hetty and the boys; yet Adam was bold enough to join them after church, and say that he would walk home with them, though all the way through the village he appeared to be chiefly occupied with Marty and Tommy, telling them about the squirrels in Binton Coppice, and promising to take them there some day.
New flowers may come out, the green embroidery of the hedges increase, but the same heaven broods overhead, soft, thick, and blue, the same figures, seen and unseen, are wandering by coppice and meadow.
Reinforcing himself, after his shake, with a little brandy and much swearing, he walked as fast as he could to a coppice on his right hand, through which it occurred to him that he could make his way to Batherley without danger of encountering any member of the hunt.
She had discovered that a lane opened out below the apple orchard and ran up through a belt of woodland; and she had explored it to its furthest end in all its delicious vagaries of brook and bridge, fir coppice and wild cherry arch, corners thick with fern, and branching byways of maple and mountain ash.
Even as you may see in coppice woods; if you leave your staddles too thick, you shall never have clean underwood, but shrubs and bushes.
They determined on walking round Beechen Cliff, that noble hill whose beautiful verdure and hanging coppice render it so striking an object from almost every opening in Bath.
Ye triple high-roads, and thou hidden glen, Coppice, and pass where meet the three-branched ways, Ye drank my blood, the life-blood these hands spilt, My father's; do ye call to mind perchance Those deeds of mine ye witnessed and the work I wrought thereafter when I came to Thebes?
John's Road; struck down the small street which terminates at Sadler's Wells Theatre; through Exmouth Street and Coppice Row; down the little court by the side of the workhouse; across the classic ground which once bore the name of Hockley-in-the-Hole; thence into Little Saffron Hill; and so into Saffron Hill the Great: along which the Dodger scudded at a rapid pace, directing Oliver to follow close at his heels.
One day he was living in a stick- house in the coppice, causing terror to the family of old Mr.
The shrub here often attains the height of fifteen or twenty feet, and forms an almost impenetrable coppice, burthening the air with its fragrance.
He sprang upon them as a lion fastens on the neck of some cow or heifer when the herd is feeding in a coppice. For all their vain struggles he flung them both from their chariot and stripped the armour from their bodies.
Then a kick of devilish energy sent the whole loosened square of thin wood flying into the pathway, and a great gap of dark coppice gaped in the paling.