copresence

copresence

(kəʊˈprɛzəns)
n
the presence of multiple things together
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Another key area of future development will be in the telepresence and copresence space.
They make it possible to organize without direct contact, even eliminating the need for "copresence" of participants in the same space (Earl & Kimport, 2011).
This same ratio of relativity pertains to the copresence of the "shapes" of surroundability and directionality, manifestations of sound presences.
The Independent and interactive effects of embodied-agent appearance and behavior on self-report, cognitive, and behavioral markers of copresence in immersive virtual environments.
However, Genette's definition of intertextuality is more restrictive in this sense, being the "relationship of copresence between two texts or among several texts: that is to say, eidetically and typically as the actual presence of one text within another" (Genette 1-2).
In practice, in a real sample, a main compound may be present at a concentration below the limit of detection and yet a signal may be picked up, because of the copresence of active metabolites.
The titular phrase "unfinished business" summoned a tension latent in the exhibition, namely the copresence of aboriginal Australian and white Australian "feminisms." In Melbourne, the saying "unfinished business" is frequently invoked by prominent Gunai/Mara activist Robbie Thorpe in reference to Australia's violent colonial history, its ongoing expression, and the lack of justice for aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people.
We cannot invoke a golden moment of copresence of humans and land.
Copresence of tet(K) and tet(M) in livestock-associated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clonal complex 398 is associated with increased fitness during exposure to sublethal concentrations of tetracycline.
This was stressed by Karlheinz Stierle (with a latitude that is all the broader for his focus on Italian Renaissance culture) when he claimed that "the experience of the copresence of cultures is perhaps the most important aspect of what we call Renaissance"; he combined this claim for convergence with an insistence on relational and mobile processes by declaring that the "Renaissance" is characteristically "the culture of the communication of cultures." (23)