copse

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copse

 (kŏps)
n.
A thicket of small trees or shrubs; a coppice.

[Middle English copys, from Old French copeiz, thicket for cutting, from coper, couper, to cut; see cope1.]

copse

(kɒps)
n
(Forestry) another word for coppice1
[C16: by shortening from coppice]

copse

(kɒps)

also coppice



n.
a thicket of small trees or bushes; a small wood.
[1570–80; alter. of coppice]

Copse

 a thicket of underwood and small trees; the underwood of a wood or forest.
Example: copse of trees, 1578.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.copse - a dense growth of bushescopse - a dense growth of bushes    
botany, flora, vegetation - all the plant life in a particular region or period; "Pleistocene vegetation"; "the flora of southern California"; "the botany of China"
brake - an area thickly overgrown usually with one kind of plant
canebrake - a dense growth of cane (especially giant cane)
spinney - a copse that shelters game
underbrush, undergrowth, underwood - the brush (small trees and bushes and ferns etc.) growing beneath taller trees in a wood or forest
Translations

copse

[kɒps] Nsoto m, bosquecillo m

copse

[ˈkɒps] n (= coppice) → taillis m

copse

nWäldchen nt
References in classic literature ?
Never had his gold been so golden, his azure so dazzlingly clear and deep as on this particular May morning; while his fancy simply ran riot in the marginal decorations of woodland and spinney, quaint embroidered flowers and copses full of exquisitely painted and wonderfully trained birds of song.
The place fixed on for the stand-shooting was not far above a stream in a little aspen copse.
There was no trace of Flora on that nearer side of the bank where my observation of her had been most startling, and none on the opposite edge, where, save for a margin of some twenty yards, a thick copse came down to the water.
On the left our troops were close to a copse, in which smoked the bonfires of our infantry who were felling wood.
The copse, the oxen, the lease-hold, the shop, the tavern, the house with the iron-roofed barn, and my heir,' thought he.
It was one in the morning when we arrived at the first slopes of the mountain; but to gain access to them we must venture through the difficult paths of a vast copse.
As soon as they entered the copse, Lady Catherine began in the following manner: --
Every minute a fresh gun came into position until, before twilight, every copse, every row of suburban villas on the hilly slopes about Kingston and Richmond, masked an expectant black muzzle.