copulative


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cop·u·la·tive

 (kŏp′yə-lā′tĭv, -lə-tĭv)
adj.
1. Grammar
a. Serving to connect coordinate words or clauses: a copulative conjunction.
b. Serving as a copula: a copulative verb.
2. Of or relating to copulation.
n. Grammar
A copulative word or group of words.

cop′u·la′tive·ly adv.

copulative

(ˈkɒpjʊlətɪv)
adj
1. serving to join or unite
2. of or characteristic of copulation
3. (Grammar) grammar (of a verb) having the nature of a copula
ˈcopulatively adv

cop•u•la•tive

(ˈkɒp yəˌleɪ tɪv, -lə tɪv)

adj.
1. serving to unite or couple.
2.
a. (of a verb) pertaining to or serving as a copula.
b. (of a conjunction) serving to connect words, phrases, or clauses of equal rank with a cumulative effect, as and.
3. pertaining to sexual intercourse.
n.
4. a copulative word.
[1350–1400; Middle English < Latin]
cop′u•la`tive•ly, adv.

copulative

Used to describe a verb that acts as a copula.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.copulative - an equating verb (such as `be' or `become') that links the subject with the complement of a sentence
verb - a content word that denotes an action, occurrence, or state of existence
Adj.1.copulative - syntactically connecting sentences or elements of a sentence; "`and' is a copulative conjunction"
grammar - the branch of linguistics that deals with syntax and morphology (and sometimes also deals with semantics)
conjunctive - serving or tending to connect
Translations

copulative

[ˈkɒpjʊlətɪv] ADJcopulativo

copulative

(Gram)
nKopula f
adjkopulativ

copulative

[ˈkɒpjʊlətɪv] adjcopulativo/a
References in periodicals archive ?
* The word [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] of ancient origin was replaced in the translations done at the end of the 20th and beginning of the 21st centuries by a copulative compound also of ancient origin.
There are, of course, familiar instances in which the conjunctive 'or' is held equivalent to the copulative conjunction 'and,' and such meaning is often given...
Those who favor the second choice consider the second kai to be disjunctive and not copulative, distinguishing between those who take the canon and "those who are part of the Israel of God, even among those who share membership in the 'New Creation and Israel.'" (Pitta 1998: 174-175; Mell 1989: 319)
Class A "Copulative compounds", called dvandva "pair" in Comparative Grammar (following the terminology introduced by Indian grammarian Pa[??]ini, ca.
(50) Polish N+N combinations in (12) are thus more phrase-like than English appositional copulative compounds, such as bomber-fighters, poet-translators or barber-surgeons discussed in Olsen (2004), where only the right-hand element is inflected.
The issue is all the more complex as the conjunction seu (sive) can only play a copulative rather than a disjunctive role here, joining two synonymous notions.
For example, in the poem, Mhondoro huru dzeZimbabwe, found in Nduri dzeZimbabwe, he repetitively uses the copulative inflecting affix lndi-1 and its allomorphs in the present continuous tense to communicate the idea that ancestors are perceived in the here and now.
Her entertaining account of her journey through punctuation pitfalls and contact with celebrated writers brings new perspectives to grammar--oto beo is a copulative verb (it links nouns together), and pronouns are the avatars of nouns.
H1 histone is copulative and will join the DNA which enters to nucleosome.