copy girl

copy girl

also cop·y·girl (kŏp′ē-gûrl′)
n.
A girl employed by a newspaper or broadcast news office to carry copy and run errands.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
At that time Katharine Graham owned Newsweek, and the interviewer told her she was a brilliant woman, and very welcome to be a researcher, a copy girl or a secretary, but reporters were men.
"Our friend Nora Ephron [writer and director of Sleepless In Seattle, You've Got Mail and Julie & Julia] was a brilliant woman and when she went to interview at Newsweek, she was told she was very welcome to be a researcher, copy girl or secretary, but reporters are men."
The one where uber-sensitive Ross, after Rachel tells him they need to take a break, gets drunk and sleeps with that cute copy girl?
I had the lowliest job possible: I was a copy girl, and that meant I had to run around the building passing papers from one desk to another.
David Morrissey and Peter Capaldi, pictured, are both fantastic as the chain-smoking, hard boozing "mean spirited bunch of b***, with hearts like bone and minds trained to think the worst of everyone," while Jayd Johnson is a real discovery as Paddy Meehan the young office copy girl who finds herself right in the middle of the deadly mystery.
Jayd plays copy girl Paddy, working in a Glasgow newspaper office in 1982.
While being inducted into the Society of Professional Journalists' Hall of Fame in 1992, Mary Lou Forbes recalled "falling in love" with journalism as a copy girl at the former Washington Evening Star.
Sarah, who works as a copy girl at the Sunday Mail, now hopes to impress the judges in a gorgeous gown by Scots designer Spencer Railton.
Once on the job, she quickly finds out that her role is less of an assistant journalist and more of a coffee and copy girl. She uses her ingenuity to find a unique angle on a star's story, making her boss finally notice that she has other talents.
After her 1942 graduation from college, she went to Washington as a copy girl for the Washington Daily News.
Young Helen declared her news ambitions at age 12, joined the Washington Daily News as a $17.50-a-week copy girl at 22, and moved to United Press International after a year.
(Not that it would have mattered; he'd already been reported by another copy girl -- to no apparent punitive effect.) Yet, even while they are oblivious to the conditions of women working in their own office, the same editors become downright Victorian on the abstract issue of women's virtue.