copytaker

copytaker

(ˈkɒpɪˌteɪkə)
n
(Journalism & Publishing) (esp in a newspaper office) a person employed to type reports as journalists dictate them over the telephone
References in periodicals archive ?
I found it virtually impossible to hear my copytaker on the other end of the line as I phoned in my match report to the Sports Gazette.
I'd write my report in longhand and he would run down to a phonebox and phone it over to a copytaker in Newcastle.
It reminded me of the old days in journalism when reporters had to phone copy over and there was no more withering insult than hearing the bored copytaker ask: "is there much more of this?
Sweating like the pigs at the show, I got through to a cheerful copytaker who told me Gaynor, Athena and Joan were busy and she had been drafted in.
Having spent three hours in Kinshasa trying to get through to his newspaper to file copy he finally got connected to a copytaker in London.
I got a copytaker who was obviously tired and was also a West Ham supporter and he took great pleasure in laughing at the result.
These days she dictates what she's writing, which is more difficult for the copytaker (again, son Sean) than it is for her.
I returned to the office in Raynes Park that evening to discover the copytaker thought I had been at Toaster
Mother Joyce was born and bred in Coventry, and was secretary to the Students' Union at Lanchester Poly, then school secretary Parkgate Junior School, and also a sports copytaker at the Telegraph.
I have always enjoyed writing, and in the 1960s and 1980s enjoyed working as a copytaker at the Bournemouth Evening Echo, writing up weddings and minor items.
FROM newspaper copytaker, to book dealer, and now host at The Manor House on remote Rathlin Island off the Antrim coast, Charlene Arnold has had an interesting career path.
My later experience came when I joined the Chronicle in 2005 and I found myself sending live rolling copy down the phone to famous copytaker, Sandy, at Thomson House.