coquette


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co·quette

 (kō-kĕt′)
n.
A woman who regularly makes romantic or sexual overtures; a flirt.

[French, feminine of coquet, flirtatious man; see coquet.]

co·quet′tish adj.
co·quet′tish·ly adv.
co·quet′tish·ness n.

coquette

(kəʊˈkɛt; kɒˈkɛt)
n
1. a woman who flirts
2. (Animals) any hummingbird of the genus Lophornis, esp the crested Brazilian species L. magnifica
[C17: from French, feminine of coquet]
coˈquettish adj
coˈquettishly adv
coˈquettishness n

co•quette

(koʊˈkɛt)

n.
a woman who flirts insincerely with men to win their admiration and attention.
[1605–15; < French, feminine of coquet]
co•quet′tish, adj.
co•quet′tish•ly, adv.
co•quet′tish•ness, n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.coquette - a seductive woman who uses her sex appeal to exploit mencoquette - a seductive woman who uses her sex appeal to exploit men
adult female, woman - an adult female person (as opposed to a man); "the woman kept house while the man hunted"
Verb1.coquette - talk or behave amorously, without serious intentionscoquette - talk or behave amorously, without serious intentions; "The guys always try to chat up the new secretaries"; "My husband never flirts with other women"
talk, speak - exchange thoughts; talk with; "We often talk business"; "Actions talk louder than words"
wanton - engage in amorous play
vamp - act seductively with (someone)

coquette

noun
A woman who is given to flirting:
Informal: vamp.
Translations

coquette

[kəˈket] Ncoqueta f

coquette

[kɒˈkɛt kəʊˈkɛt] n (= flirt) → coquette f

coquette

coquette

[kəʊˈkɛt] ncivetta (fig)
References in classic literature ?
Vernon on being about to receive into your family the most accomplished coquette in England.
You seem almost like a coquette, upon my life you do--a coquette of the first urban water
But, to tell you the truth, she is also a franche coquette.
She is a vain coquette, and her tricks have not answered.
Herself a consummate coquette, she could not have maneuvered better on meeting a man she wished to attract.
The words might have been those of a coquette, but the full, bright glance Maggie turned on Philip was not that of a coquette.
I have heard ladies call her coquette, not understanding that she shone softly upon all who entered the lists because, with the rarest intuition, she foresaw that they must go away broken men and already sympathised with their dear wounds.
Oh how much, and how keenly, the little coquette of five years ago, felt now
She was withal a little of a coquette, as might be perceived even in her dress, which was a mixture of ancient and modern fashions, as most suited to set of her charms.
I rather think his appearance there was distasteful to Catherine; she was not artful, never played the coquette, and had evidently an objection to her two friends meeting at all; for when Heathcliff expressed contempt of Linton in his presence, she could not half coincide, as she did in his absence; and when Linton evinced disgust and antipathy to Heathcliff, she dared not treat his sentiments with indifference, as if depreciation of her playmate were of scarcely any consequence to her.
The look produced its effect -- the two faces brightened; but immediately, as if the royal coquette thought she had done too much for simple mortals, she made a movement, turned her back on both her adorers, and appeared plunged in a reverie in which it was evident they had no part.
She has no conversation," he said, "and I am afraid that she is a coquette, for she is always flirting with the wind.