ligament

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lig·a·ment

 (lĭg′ə-mənt)
n.
1. Anatomy A sheet or band of tough, fibrous tissue connecting bones or cartilages at a joint or supporting an organ.
2. A unifying or connecting tie or bond.

[Middle English, from Medieval Latin ligāmentum, from Latin, bandage, from ligāre, to bind; see lien.]

lig′a·men′tal (-mĕn′tl), lig′a·men′ta·ry (-mĕn′tə-rē, -mĕn′trē), lig′a·men′tous adj.

ligament

(ˈlɪɡəmənt)
n
1. (Anatomy) anatomy any one of the bands or sheets of tough fibrous connective tissue that restrict movement in joints, connect various bones or cartilages, support muscles, etc
2. any physical or abstract connection or bond
[C14: from Medieval Latin ligāmentum, from Latin (in the sense: bandage), from ligāre to bind]

lig•a•ment

(ˈlɪg ə mənt)

n.
1. a band of strong connective tissue serving to connect bones or hold organs in place.
2. a tie or bond: The desire for freedom is a ligament uniting all peoples.
[1375–1425; late Middle English < Medieval Latin ligāmentum, Latin: bandage <ligā(re) to tie. See -ment]

lig·a·ment

(lĭg′ə-mənt)
A sheet or band of tough fibrous tissue that connects two bones or holds an organ of the body in place.

ligament

Fibrous tissue that connects bones.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.ligament - a sheet or band of tough fibrous tissue connecting bones or cartilages or supporting muscles or organsligament - a sheet or band of tough fibrous tissue connecting bones or cartilages or supporting muscles or organs
connective tissue - tissue of mesodermal origin consisting of e.g. collagen fibroblasts and fatty cells; supports organs and fills spaces between them and forms tendons and ligaments
falciform ligament - a ligament that attaches part of the liver to the diaphragm and the abdominal wall
ligamentum teres uteri, round ligament of the uterus - ligament attached to the uterus on either side in front of and below the opening of the Fallopian tube and passing through the inguinal canal to the labia majora
muscle system, muscular structure, musculature - the muscular system of an organism
2.ligament - any connection or unifying bond
attachment, bond - a connection that fastens things together
binder, ligature - something used to tie or bind
chain - a series of (usually metal) rings or links fitted into one another to make a flexible ligament
wire - ligament made of metal and used to fasten things or make cages or fences etc

ligament

noun
That which unites or binds:
Translations
رِباط
šlachavaz
ledbånd
ínszalag
liîband
靱帯
saite

ligament

[ˈlɪgəmənt] Nligamento m

ligament

[ˈlɪgəmənt] nligament m
to have a torn ligament → souffrir d'une déchirure des ligaments
He suffered torn ligaments in his knee
BUT Il a été victime d'une déchirure des ligaments du genou.

ligament

nBand nt, → Ligament nt; he’s torn a ligament in his shoulderer hat einen Bänderriss in der Schulter

ligament

[ˈlɪgəmənt] nlegamento

ligament

(ˈligəmənt) noun
a piece of tough substance that joins together the bones of the body. She pulled a ligament in her knee when she fell.

lig·a·ment

n. ligamento.
1. banda de fibras de tejido conjuntivo que protege las articulaciones y evita que sufran torceduras o luxaciones;
2. banda protectora de fascias y músculos que conectan o sostienen vísceras;
acromioclavicular ______ acromioclavicular;
alveolo-dental ______ alveolodentario;
anococcygeal ______ anococcígeo;
brachiocubital ______ braquiocubital;
capsular ______ capsular;
gastrocholic ______ gastrocólico;
glossoepiglottic ______ glosoepiglótico;
hepatoduodenal ______ hepatoduodenal;
iliofemoral ______ iliofemoral;
___ teardesgarre del ___;
long plantar ______ largo del plantar;
palmar ______ palmar;
radiocubital ______ radiocubital;
sternoclavicular ______ esternoclavicular;
trapezoid ______ trapezoide.

ligament

n ligamento; anterior cruciate — ligamento cruzado anterior
References in periodicals archive ?
The lateral end of the clavicle is fixed to the coracoid process by the coracoclavicular ligament, having the lateral trapezoid and medial conoid parts.
[3] The possible mechanisms leading to the fracture are coracoclavicular ligament avulsion during an AC dislocation; a direct blow to the process, or extremely forceful contraction of the biceps and/or the pectoralis minor muscles.
Anatomical coracoclavicular ligament reconstructions, such as the ligament augmentation and reconstruction system ("LARS comp," Arc-sur-Tille, Dijon, France), have been popularized in acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) dislocations owing to close biomechanical properties to the native joint [1].
Yang, "Clinical results of single-tunnel coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction using autogenous semitendinosus tendon," American Journal of Sports Medicine, vol.
Currently there are four main surgical options for AC joint disruptions: (1) primary AC joint fixation (using pins, screws, suture wires, plates, and the hook plate) with or without ligament repair reconstruction; (2) primary fixation of the coracoclavicular interval with or without acromioclavicular ligament reconstruction; (3) distal clavicle excision with or without coracoclavicular ligament repair; (4) muscle transfer with or without distal clavicle excision [8].
The patients with bone fracture and dislocation are often complicated with injuries in acromioclavicular ligament and coracoclavicular ligament.1 Shoulder injuries are generally subjected to conservative treatment and surgical treatment.
They were treated with open reduction and internal fixation of the fracture using an anatomically-contoured, low-profile distal clavicle plate and coracoclavicular ligament augmentation with a coracoclavicular cerclage.
In particular, the coracoclavicular ligament (CC ligament) showed no abnormalities.
The treatment of distal clavicle fractures with coracoclavicular ligament disruption: a report of 10 cases.
Biomechanical and radiographic analysis of partial coracoclavicular ligament injuries.