coracoid

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cor·a·coid

 (kôr′ə-koid′, kŏr′-)
n.
1. A bony process projecting from the scapula toward the sternum in mammals.
2. A beak-shaped bone articulating with the scapula and sternum in many other vertebrates, such as birds and reptiles.
adj.
Of, relating to, or resembling a coracoid.

[New Latin coracoīdēs, from Greek korakoeidēs, ravenlike : korax, korak-, raven + -oeidēs, -oid.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

coracoid

(ˈkɒrəˌkɔɪd)
n
(Zoology) a paired ventral bone of the pectoral girdle in vertebrates. In mammals it is reduced to a peg (the coracoid process) on the scapula
[C18: from New Latin coracoīdēs, from Greek korakoeidēs like a raven, curved like a raven's beak, from korax raven]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cor•a•coid

(ˈkɔr əˌkɔɪd, ˈkɒr-)

n.
a bony process on the scapula of mammals that extends to the sternum in birds, reptiles, and monotremes.
[1700–10; < New Latin coracoīdēs < Greek korakoeidḗs ravenlike =korak-, s. of kórax raven + -oeidēs -oid]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

cor·a·coid

n. coracoides, apófisis del omóplato.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012
References in periodicals archive ?
(11-13) In this particular case, conventional radiographs allowed us to diagnose the malformation of the sternum, fusion of the furcula to the sternum, and asymmetry of the pectoral girdle but did not allow us to evaluate in detail the junctions between the scapula, coracoids, furcula, and sternum.
Intraoperatively lipoma was found to be occupying whole axilla extending up to pectoralis major muscle in the chest and was densely adhered to periosteum of coracoids process and humerus.
The bird showed severe trauma on its left wing and upon physical examination it was revealed that there were muscular hemorrhages and perforation in the pectoral muscles, multiple open fractures of the humerus, coracoids, and left clavicle due to impact from bullet or shot pellets.
Finally, male coracoids were observed to be longer than females, with males having longer coracoid tip-glenoid distances.
The explorers also found cervical vertebrate, coracoids, lower part of scapula, ribs and other bones, Verma added.
Secondary deformities such as the elongation of the coracoids, flattening or deformation of the humeral head with subluxation or posterior dislocation and flattening or retroversion of the glenoid may be found (7, 8).
Material: SDNMH; 50668, distal right humerus; 51597 and 51598, distal left humeri; 51604 and 51605, right coracoids; 50673 and 61249, distal right ulnae; 50601, proximal left unla; 50699, proximal right tibiotarsus; 51612, right tarsometatarsus; 50697 vertebra.
After the desired reduction is achieved, a hole of 3.2 mm is drilled centrally through clavicle into the coracoids and a 4 mm cancellous screw is fixed.
A small duck is represented by two proximal humeri, two distal coracoids and a carpometacarpus (SBMNH 752).