coralline


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cor·al·line

 (kôr′ə-lĭn, -līn′, kŏr′-)
adj.
1. Of, consisting of, or producing coral.
2. Resembling coral, especially in color.
n.
1. Any of various red algae of the family Corallinaceae whose fronds are covered with calcareous deposits.
2. Any of various organisms that resemble coral, such as certain bryozoans.

[French corallin, from Late Latin corallīnus, from Latin corallium, coral; see coral.]

coralline

(ˈkɒrəˌlaɪn)
adj
1. (Zoology) Also: coralloid of, relating to, or resembling coral
2. (Colours) of the colour of coral
n
3. (Plants) any of various red algae impregnated with calcium carbonate, esp any of the genus Corallina
4. (Animals) any of various animals that resemble coral, such as certain sponges
[C16: from Late Latin corallīnus coral red, from Latin corāllium coral]

cor•al•line

(ˈkɔr ə lɪn, -ˌlaɪn, ˈkɒr-)

adj.
1. composed of coral or having the structure of coral.
2. corallike.
n.
3. any red alga impregnated with lime.
[1535–45; < Late Latin corallīnus coral red. See coral, -ine1]
Translations
References in classic literature ?
As to the vessel, it moved not, and was immovable, as if the coralline polypi had already walled it up with their in destructible cement.
They crimped and curled her hair, they polished her neck and arms with some fragrant powder, touched her lips with coralline salve to make them redder, and Hortense would have added `a soupcon of rouge', if Meg had not rebelled.
It is remarkable that in all the different kinds of glowworms, shining elaters, and various marine animals (such as the crustacea, medusae, nereidae, a coralline of the genus Clytia, and Pyrosma), which I have observed, the light has been of a well-marked green colour.
Researchers from Heriot-Watt University in Edinburgh and Glasgow University pumped water enriched with carbon dioxide into chambers placed over the coralline algal ecosystem and monitored the community's response before, during and after exposure.
Famed for its swath of pink coralline sand; lovely hues which are form from powdered red organ pipe corals mixed with white sand; velvety beach line and astonishing turquoise clear water, Sta Cruz Island joins the few pink sand beaches in the planet as National Geographic lists it as one of the 21 best beaches in the world.
Itbayat, one of the world's largest upturned coralline islands, is the domain of the Ivatan-Itbayat people as recognized by their certificate of ancestral domain title.
Coralline Blackwood is an exacting matriarch who wields the Bible as a weapon.
Second, following overexploitation, mussel beds are replaced by beds of coralline macroalgae (Dye 1992) that intercept settling mussel larvae, which are then incapable of transferring onto the primary substratum (Erlandsson et al.
Most collections were taken from rocky intertidal regions along the Southern Caribbean coast by breaking fossil or living coralline rocks and removing polychaete specimens.
It's known as crustose coralline algae, or CCA, and it's particularly sensitive to acidification, which is a major consequence of increased carbon dioxide in the Earth's atmosphere: the acidity of marine waters increases as our oceans absorb more and more carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.
The entity in Tabarium: Form 150920, 2015, appeared at once a voracious, coralline organism and a patchwork-like interstellar habitat, confounding natural and technological accretions.
Seawater is already 30 per cent more acidic than it used to be and sensitive organisms such as crustose coralline algae are likely to be responding to those changes,' Fabricius says.