corallite


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corallite

(ˈkɒrəlaɪt)
n
(Zoology) the skeleton of a coral polyp
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Possessing gross morphological characteristics similar to the Indo-Pacific genus Acanthastrea Milne Edwards & Haime, 1848, it was initially recognised as a separate genus due to the smaller corallite diameter of [less than or equai to]8 mm for its first members--M.
Identification of the Siderastrea species is based on the number of septa and septa cycles per corallite, and by the species' mechanisms of reproduction.
Nelson (1977) used four parameters in the taxonomy of syringoporid corals; two of which are the corallite diameter and the frequency of corallites (number of corallites that occur within a certain area).
Colonies were classified as having intermediate mortality when the skeleton was slightly eroded or covered by a fine layer of sediment, filamentous algae, diatoms or cyanobacteria, and the structure of the corallite could still be observed.
The fish were raised in glass aquaria (200 L water) which were connected to an automatically controlled recirculation system and every three aquaria were connected to a separate recycling system and were supplied with aerated water which was filtered through zeolum, corallite and activated carbon.
Scrutton (1989) distinguished ontogenetic (visible development of the corallite), astogenetic (apparent development of the corallum), cyclomorphic (cycling of growth bands), and topomorphic (caused by environmental impacts) variation, expressed at the corallum level.
The new polyp remains attached to its parent and builds its own stony corallite. Through this process, huge colonies can evolve.
Scleractinian corals typically display a striking degree of morphological variation in colony shape and corallite structure along environmental gradients (Foster 1980, Brown et al.
Patterns of calcium carbonate accretion in the axial corallite. Coral Reeft 1: 45-5] .
Due to the simple morphology of internal characters like the polygonal corallites, pores predominantly located in corners, variable thickness of corallite wall and septal development, and by the similar size of corallites, this species is easily confused with P.