cordage


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cord·age

 (kôr′dĭj)
n.
1. Cords or ropes, especially the ropes in the rigging of a ship.
2. The amount of wood in an area as measured in cords.

cordage

(ˈkɔːdɪdʒ)
n
1. (Nautical Terms) nautical the lines and rigging of a vessel
2. (Forestry) an amount of wood measured in cords

cord•age

(ˈkɔr dɪdʒ)

n.
1. lines, hawsers, etc., esp. on the rigging of a vessel.
2. a quantity of wood measured in cords.
[1480–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cordage - the amount of wood in an area as measured in cords
quantity, measure, amount - how much there is or how many there are of something that you can quantify
2.cordage - the ropes in the rigging of a ship
rope - a strong line
sennit - flat braided cordage that is used on ships
Translations

cordage

[ˈkɔːdɪdʒ] Ncordaje m, cordería f

cordage

n no plTauwerk nt
References in classic literature ?
Lank Bildad, as pilot, headed the first watch, and ever and anon, as the old craft deep dived into the green seas, and sent the shivering frost all over her, and the winds howled, and the cordage rang, his steady notes were heard, -- Sweet fields beyond the swelling flood, Stand dressed in living green.
To sailors, oaths are household words; they will swear in the trance of the calm, and in the teeth of the tempest; they will imprecate curses from the topsail-yard-arms, when most they teter over to a seething sea; but in all my voyagings, seldom have I heard a common oath when God's burning finger has been laid on the ship; when his mene, mene, Tekel Upharsin has been woven into the shrouds and the cordage.
There were many things to be brought up from the beach and stored in the outhouse - as oars, nets, sails, cordage, spars, lobster-pots, bags of ballast, and the like; and though there was abundance of assistance rendered, there being not a pair of working hands on all that shore but would have laboured hard for Mr.
The evening breeze had sprung up, and though it was well warded off by the hill with the two peaks upon the east, the cordage had begun to sing a little softly to itself and the idle sails to rattle to and fro.
The seamen were all provided with cordage, which I had beforehand twisted to a sufficient strength.
These gelves have given occasion to the report that out of the cocoa-tree alone a ship may be built, fitted out with masts, sails, and cordage, and victualled with bread, water, wine, sugar, vinegar, and oil.
The young countess, seated beside her husband, watched the progress of the work with regret that she could not help it; and yet she did assist in making knots to secure the cordage.
Canvas and cordage strain and masts and yards creak.
However tightly moored, they range a little at their berths, swaying imperceptibly the spire- like assemblages of cordage and spars.
The supporting power being estimated at 2500 pounds, and the united weights of the party amounting only to about 1200, there was left a surplus of 1300, of which again 1200 was exhausted by ballast, arranged in bags of different sizes, with their respective weights marked upon them - by cordage, barometers, telescopes, barrels containing provision for a fortnight, water-casks, cloaks, carpet-bags, and various other indispensable matters, including a coffee-warmer, contrived for warming coffee by means of slack-lime, so as to dispense altogether with fire, if it should be judged prudent to do so.
The sea was heaving under a thick white fog; and nothing else was moving but a few early ropemakers, who, with the yarn twisted round their bodies, looked as if, tired of their present state of existence, they were spinning themselves into cordage.
These I had attached to the lashings which had been blown asunder by the explosion; at one end of the coop the ring-bolt had been torn clean out, but at the other it was the cordage that had parted.