cords


Also found in: Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Idioms, Encyclopedia.
Related to cords: medullary cords

cord

 (kôrd)
n.
1. A slender length of flexible material usually made of twisted strands or fibers and used to bind, tie, connect, or support. See Usage Note at chord1.
2. An insulated flexible electric wire fitted with a plug or plugs.
3. A hangman's rope.
4. An influence, feeling, or force that binds or restrains; a bond or tie.
5. also chord Anatomy A long ropelike structure, such as a nerve or tendon: a spinal cord.
6.
a. A raised rib on the surface of cloth.
b. A fabric or cloth with such ribs.
7. cords Pants made of corduroy.
8. A unit of quantity for cut fuel wood, equal to a stack measuring 4 × 4 × 8 feet or 128 cubic feet (3.62 cubic meters).
tr.v. cord·ed, cord·ing, cords
1. To fasten or bind with a cord: corded the stack of old newspapers and placed them in the recycling bin.
2. To furnish with a cord.
3. To pile (wood) in cords.

[Middle English, from Old French corde, from Latin chorda, from Greek khordē; see gherə- in Indo-European roots.]

cord′er n.

cords

(kɔːdz)
pl n
(Clothing & Fashion) trousers, esp jeans, made of corduroy
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cords - cotton trousers made of corduroy cloth
trouser, pant - (usually in the plural) a garment extending from the waist to the knee or ankle, covering each leg separately; "he had a sharp crease in his trousers"
plural, plural form - the form of a word that is used to denote more than one
References in classic literature ?
The doctor jumped at his wife's plan, and they took up the hunchback, and passing cords under his armpits they let him down into the purveyor's bed-room so gently that he really seemed to be leaning against the wall.
Next, Lamai tied him securely with a sennit cord about the neck and untied the cords that bit into his legs.
The master of our camels was an old Mohammedan, who had conceived an opinion that it was an act of merit to do us all the mischief he could; and in pursuance of his notion, made it his chief employment to steal everything he could lay hold on; his piety even transported him so far, that one morning he stole and hid the cords of our tents.
These fish constitute a principal article of their food; the women drying them and stringing them on cords. As the uthlecan is only found in the lower part of the river, the arrival of it soon brought back the natives to the coast; who again resorted to the factory to trade, and from that time furnished plentiful supplies of fish.
Shortly afterwards, at the harvest festival, the owner released the Ox from his yoke, but bound the Heifer with cords and led him away to the altar to be slain in honor of the occasion.
Cord, in honor of the races, had put on his best clothes, a black coat buttoned up, a stiffly starched collar, which propped up his cheeks, a round black hat, and top boots.
Now, of course, this canal is filled with much the same strangely fibrous substance -- the spinal cord --as the brain; and directly communicates with the brain.
The farther he advanced in the labyrinth the more curious he became, till he was stopped by two corpses lying in the midst of a cypress alley, each with a scarlet cord round his neck and a bracelet on his arm on which were engraved their own names, and those of two Princesses.
Paulvitch carried another piece of cord in his hand.
Now, with his thick and somewhat bowed legs stretched in front of the blaze, his green jerkin thrown open, and a great quart pot held in his corded fist, he looked the picture of comfort and of good-fellowship.
But even as they looked, the cord broke, and the great kite fell headlong in a series of sweeping dives.
He is seated on a chest, with a piece of cord in his hand, looking out idly at the sea.