corduroy road

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Related to corduroy roads: Erie Canal

corduroy road

n
(Civil Engineering) a road across swampy ground, made of logs laid transversely
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A great portion of the way was over what is called a corduroy road, which is made by throwing trunks of trees into a marsh, and leaving them to settle there.
When needed they built corduroy roads to get through and dug ditches for drainage.
In an effort to offset muddy terrain and ensure mobility, engineers constructed corduroy roads (a combination of logs tied together with wire and covered with soil or rock).
These corduroy roads were repeated throughout the district wherever the natural waterways cut across the road allowances.
Although concrete has made corduroy roads but a bad memory, allowing for top speeds above 15 mph; raindrops no longer must fall upon our heads; the ladies have a mirror on the sun visor for applying makeup; and necking at a drive-in theater has become as commonplace as--well, as necking at a drive-in theater--we believe that today's readers driving a brand new CPX49176YLZ model will get a charge from traveling back to the days of the original car craze as Post cover artists saw it--beginning with the issue dated July 19, 1924.
More usefully, wood was used to move masses of men, horses, guns, and material over corduroy roads, rail beds, and bridges.
In periods of thaw, vehicles got stuck in the mud constantly, requiring construction of corduroy roads (layers of logs, gravel, and sand) for traction.
In the chapter "Mud and Engineers," Wood discusses the use of corduroy roads in muddy areas; these engineer-built log roads were used, for example, by Germans in Russian swamps.