coresident


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coresident

(kəʊˈrɛzɪdənt)
n
computing one of two or more computer programs stored in a computer memory simultaneously
adj
(of people) residing together
References in periodicals archive ?
Then, in Model (vii), we exclude households with coresident children.
Herpesvirus-specific CD8 T cell immunity in old age: cytomegalovirus impairs the response to a coresident EBV infection.
They report that hours of childcare provided by coresident grandmothers actually exceeds that of mothers, except for the case of children under age 1.
In particular in the virtualization environment, an attack on a coresident VM was demonstrated by Ristenpart et al.
is therefore fundamental to leadership as a quality rather than as a binary relationship between leader and his coresident followers.
Coresident grandparents and their grandchildren: 2012 (Current Population Reports, pp.
Financial well-being of US parents caring for coresident children and adults with developmental disabilities: An age cohort analysis.
census, there were more than 2.7 million households with grandparents raising grandchildren and over 5.7 million grandchildren being raised by their grandparents (Coresident Grandparents and Their Grandchildren: 2012, U.S.
Otherwise, the group we analyzed did not differ from the larger study population in terms of sex, race and/or ethnicity, number of coresident children, presence of a schizophrenia spectrum or bipolar diagnosis, comorbid medical conditions, self-reported functioning, or Social Security Administration (SSA) disability income beneficiary status (i.e., Supplemental Security Income [SSI] and/or Social Security Disability Insurance [SSDI]).
Demographic and socioeconomic statistical variables included gender, grade level in school, number of coresident family members, number of coresident family members earning an income, number of noncohabiting family members sending money to the family, and monthly household income (in CYN).
(3) Patients who supervised medication themselves were more likely to discontinue medication than those for whom coresident family members supervised the use of medication.
381, 388 (2001) (showing that "coresident fathers" have more social interactions than men who are not fathers).