cork cambium


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Related to cork cambium: vascular cambium

cork cambium

n.
A lateral ring of meristematic tissue found in woody seed plants, producing cork on the outside of the ring and phelloderm on the inside of the ring. Also called phellogen.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

cork cambium

n
(Botany) a layer of meristematic cells in the cortex of the stems and roots of woody plants, the outside of which gives rise to cork cells and the inside to secondary cortical cells (phelloderm). Also called: phellogen
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

phel•lo•gen

(ˈfɛl ə dʒən)

n.
a layer of plant tissue outside of the true cambium, giving rise to cork tissue.
[1870–75; < Greek phelló(s) cork + -gen]
phel`lo•ge•net′ic (-dʒəˈnɛt ɪk) phel`lo•gen′ic (-ˈdʒɛn ɪk) adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

cork cambium

A layer of cambium near the outer edge of the stems of woody plants that produces cork to the outside and cortex to the inside. Also called phellogen. See more at cambium.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Beneath the cork in the periderm are the cork cambium, an area where cell division occurs, and the thin, green cork skin, found by gently scraping away the outer bark on a young twig.
Woody plants also have two kinds of lateral meristems: the vascular cambium and cork cambium.
Instead, the outer tissues form a new layer of cells around the stem, just beneath the epidermis, called the cork cambium. This layer, like the vascular cambium, also generates new cells on both sides, but produces most of its new cells--cork cells--toward the outside.