corm


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corm

 (kôrm)
n.
A short thick solid food-storing underground stem, sometimes bearing papery scale leaves, as in the crocus or gladiolus.

[New Latin cormus, from Greek kormos, a trimmed tree trunk; see sker- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

corm

(kɔːm)
n
(Botany) an organ of vegetative reproduction in plants such as the crocus, consisting of a globular stem base swollen with food and surrounded by papery scale leaves. Compare bulb1
[C19: from New Latin cormus, from Greek kormos tree trunk from which the branches have been lopped]
ˈcormous adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

corm

(kɔrm)

n.
an enlarged, fleshy, bulblike base of a plant stem that stores food, as in a crocus.
[1820–30; < New Latin cormus < Greek kormós a tree trunk with boughs lopped off, akin to keírein to cut off, hew]
corm′like`, adj.
cor′moid, adj.
cor′mous, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

corm

(kôrm)
A fleshy underground stem that is similar to a bulb but stores its food as stem tissue and has fewer and thinner leaf-like scales. The crocus and gladiolus produce new shoots from corms. Compare bulb, rhizome, runner, tuber.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

corm

A swollen stem that has a bulb-like appearance, but without the scales of true bulbs. Corms usually have a papery outer skin. Unlike tubers, a new corm is produced annually.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.corm - solid swollen underground bulb-shaped stem or stem base and serving as a reproductive structurecorm - solid swollen underground bulb-shaped stem or stem base and serving as a reproductive structure
stalk, stem - a slender or elongated structure that supports a plant or fungus or a plant part or plant organ
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

corm

[kɔːm] N (Bot) → bulbo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

corm

nKnolle f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

corm

[kɔːm] n (Bot) → cormo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
[23] have demonstrated that different antibacterial activities occur against Pseudomonas aeruginosa depending on the structural nature of the CORM used.
The corms lie dormant in the ground through the heat of the summer before pushing new growth in early fall.
This is also probably why I was thinking of Corm Cavender, too, like I was.
I'm currently cultivating corms to naturalize on our nonprofit farming project in Zambia, but we'll also have to establish trade with richer nations such as South Africa, or the Zambians won't make any profit.
Proterris looks to continue advancing its own gaseous Phase 2/3 trial in delayed graft function prior to moving one of the CORM candidates into clinical trials, which the company aims to start in the next 18-24 months.
The structure of a CORM contains three parts: the metal core, the ligand (inner) coordination sphere or CORM sphere, and the drug (outer) sphere.
This result is relevant, because the size of the plant and the flower spike is directly related to corm diameter.
New corms are produced on top of the old corm with goodness derived both from the old corm and the leaves, which increase after flowering and contribute nutrients as they die down.
The 15 cm between row lead to the highest total yield and corm ash and the lowest corm diameter and cormlet weight (Table 5).
," Corm wrote in his 1966 tract "Essay on the Art and Civilization of this Era," "have had a ball plagiarizing the uncouth and grimacing statues of the primitive tribes of the five continents and the same with the drawings and colorings of children and schizophrenics."
Native to Africa, the corm lives only one year, but as the parent corm dies, a new corm forms on the top of the old corm.