cormorant


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cor·mo·rant

 (kôr′mər-ənt, -mə-rănt′)
n.
1. Any of several large, widely distributed marine diving birds of the genus Phalacrocorax, having dark plumage, webbed feet, and a slender hooked bill.
2. A greedy, rapacious person.
adj.
Greedy; rapacious.

[Middle English cormoraunt, from Old French cormorant : probably corp, raven; see corbel + *marenc, of the sea (later attested in dialectal French (Sark) pie marange, oystercatcher, literally magpie of the sea, and ultimately from Latin mare, sea; see mori- in Indo-European roots), perhaps influenced by Breton mor, sea (as in morvran, cormorant, literally raven of the sea).]

cormorant

(ˈkɔːmərənt)
n
(Animals) any aquatic bird of the family Phalacrocoracidae, of coastal and inland waters, having a dark plumage, a long neck and body, and a slender hooked beak: order Pelecaniformes (pelicans, etc)
[C13: from Old French cormareng, from corp raven, from Latin corvus + -mareng of the sea, from Latin mare sea]

cor•mo•rant

(ˈkɔr mər ənt)

n.
1. any of various typically dark-plumaged diving seabirds of the family Phalacrocoracidae, of worldwide distribution, having a long neck and a throat pouch for holding fish.
2. a greedy person.
[1300–50; Middle English < Middle French; Old French cormareng < Late Latin corvusmarīnus sea raven. See corvine, marine]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.cormorant - large voracious dark-colored long-necked seabird with a distensible pouch for holding fishcormorant - large voracious dark-colored long-necked seabird with a distensible pouch for holding fish; used in Asia to catch fish
pelecaniform seabird - large fish-eating seabird with four-toed webbed feet
genus Phalacrocorax, Phalacrocorax - type genus: coextensive with the family Phalacrocoracidae
Translations
kormorán
merimetso
kormorán
storskarv
kormoran

cormorant

[ˈkɔːmərənt] Ncormorán m (grande)

cormorant

[ˈkɔːrmərənt] ncormoran m

cormorant

nKormoran m

cormorant

[ˈkɔːmrnt] ncormorano
References in classic literature ?
One gleam of light lifted into relief a half-submerged mast, on which sat a cormorant, dark and large, with wings flecked with foam; its beak held a gold bracelet set with gems, that I had touched with as brilliant tints as my palette could yield, and as glittering distinctness as my pencil could impart.
I have an appetite like a cormorant, am full of life, and sleep well.
He took the wand with which he seals men's eyes in sleep or wakes them just as he pleases, and flew holding it in his hand over Pieria; then he swooped down through the firmament till he reached the level of the sea, whose waves he skimmed like a cormorant that flies fishing every hole and corner of the ocean, and drenching its thick plumage in the spray.
Of all the ingenious modes of torture that have ever been invented, that of solitary confinement is probably the most cruel--the mind feeding on itself with the rapacity of a cormorant, when the conscience quickens its activity and feeds its longings.
What will he say when, instead of a pair of plump turtle doves, billing and cooing in a bower of roses, he finds a single lean cormorant, standing mateless and shelterless on poverty's bleak cliff?
Pepper with all his learning had been mistaken for a cormorant, and then, as unjustly, transformed into a cow.
Put out of countenance by the manner in which he thus "set foot" upon the New World, he uttered a loud cry, which so frightened the innumerable cormorants and pelicans that are always perched upon these movable quays, that they flew noisily away.
You must go alone, my dear; I dare not let those two cormorants out of my sight.
Whether whales feed on them I do not know; but terns, cormorants, and immense herds of great unwieldy seals derive, on some parts of the coast, their chief sustenance from these swimming crabs.
There are those who, like cormorants and ostriches, can digest all sorts of this, even after the fullest dinner of meats and vegetables, for they suffer nothing to be wasted.
Based on amounting research pointing to IL-8 being an important driver of malignant tumors, HuMax-IL8 was taken into development by Cormorant.
Following the Great Cormorant abundance control plan approved by the Minister of Environment of the Republic of Lithuania in 2013.