corm

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corm

 (kôrm)
n.
A short thick solid food-storing underground stem, sometimes bearing papery scale leaves, as in the crocus or gladiolus.

[New Latin cormus, from Greek kormos, a trimmed tree trunk; see sker- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

corm

(kɔːm)
n
(Botany) an organ of vegetative reproduction in plants such as the crocus, consisting of a globular stem base swollen with food and surrounded by papery scale leaves. Compare bulb1
[C19: from New Latin cormus, from Greek kormos tree trunk from which the branches have been lopped]
ˈcormous adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

corm

(kɔrm)

n.
an enlarged, fleshy, bulblike base of a plant stem that stores food, as in a crocus.
[1820–30; < New Latin cormus < Greek kormós a tree trunk with boughs lopped off, akin to keírein to cut off, hew]
corm′like`, adj.
cor′moid, adj.
cor′mous, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

corm

(kôrm)
A fleshy underground stem that is similar to a bulb but stores its food as stem tissue and has fewer and thinner leaf-like scales. The crocus and gladiolus produce new shoots from corms. Compare bulb, rhizome, runner, tuber.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

corm

A swollen stem that has a bulb-like appearance, but without the scales of true bulbs. Corms usually have a papery outer skin. Unlike tubers, a new corm is produced annually.
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.corm - solid swollen underground bulb-shaped stem or stem base and serving as a reproductive structurecorm - solid swollen underground bulb-shaped stem or stem base and serving as a reproductive structure
stalk, stem - a slender or elongated structure that supports a plant or fungus or a plant part or plant organ
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

corm

[kɔːm] N (Bot) → bulbo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

corm

nKnolle f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

corm

[kɔːm] n (Bot) → cormo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in periodicals archive ?
If you plant your corms in succession at two-week intervals you can have flowers all summer long.
* MICE: These will feed on the seeds of germinating sweetcorn, peas and beans and also eat crocus corms and orchard fruits.
Whatever depth, the corms have the habit of pulling themselves up or down to their preferred depth.
Double forms available as corms include Figaro, fiery bronze; Blue Bayou, purple; Yvonne, yellow; and Teresa, white.
There are lots of pre-packed bulbs, corms and tubers currently available.
Most bulbs and corms can be put into containers almost shoulder-to-shoulder--certainly not more than 1 inch apart.
Remaining corms can be planted in their original pot with fresh compost, kept cool, but frost free.
Plant corms 4 to 6 inches deep and at least 6 inches apart.
this was a mammoth task as the corms were huge and extremely hard and I was very tempted to use a pick-axe to cut through them.
Before planting, soak your bulbs/ corms for around 2 hours in room temperature water.
Colocasia (Arbi) is a tropical plant grown primarily for its edible corms, the root vegetable is also known as taro.
These complexes are now referred to as "carbon monoxide releasing molecules (CORMs)." A CORM is made up of two parts: a CORM sphere and a drug sphere.