corn marigold

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Related to corn marigolds: Chrysanthemum segetum

corn marigold

n
(Plants) an annual plant, Chrysanthemum segetum, with yellow daisy-like flower heads: a common weed of cultivated land: family Asteraceae (composites)
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.corn marigold - European herb with bright yellow flowers; a common weed in grain fields
genus Chrysanthemum - in some classifications many plants usually assigned to the genus Chrysanthemum have been divided among other genera: e.g. Argyranthemum; Dendranthema; Leucanthemum; Tanacetum
chrysanthemum - any of numerous perennial Old World herbs having showy brightly colored flower heads of the genera Chrysanthemum, Argyranthemum, Dendranthema, Tanacetum; widely cultivated
References in periodicals archive ?
While wood pigeons have prospered from a switch to autumn sowing, which has provided more reliable winter food, the loss of ponds has hit great crested newts, and increased herbicides have caused a huge decline in corn marigolds.
There are usually seeds of corn poppies, corn marigolds, cornflowers and corn cockle in annual "cornfield" mixes, vividly coloured flowers all excellent for pollinators.
A coroner's report showed that a Jane Shaxspere drowned aged two-and-a-half while picking corn marigolds 20 miles from Stratford-upon-Avon in 1569.
This year at Butterfly World, we've sown the whole site with cornfield annuals - corn marigolds, cornflowers, poppies, corn chamomile.
If you have well-cultivated soil, annuals such as cornflowers, corn poppies, corn marigolds and corncockles will do well.
THIS covers 80,000sq m and sees pot marigolds, tickseed and corn marigolds creating a ribbon of gold around the stadium.
A coroner's report shows Jane Shaxspere drowned aged two-and-ahalf while picking corn marigolds 20 miles from Stratford in 1569, when the playwright would have been aged about five.
Further natural elements are added through the extensive use of wood, the meadowstyle planting around the boundaries of the garden, plus the incorporation of bee and insect-friendly plants like corn marigolds and field poppies.