corncrake


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corn·crake

 (kôrn′krāk′)
n.
A common bird (Crex crex) of Eurasia and Africa, having a short bill and brownish-yellow plumage and found in grain fields and meadows.

corncrake

(ˈkɔːnˌkreɪk)
n
(Animals) a common Eurasian rail, Crex crex, of fields and meadows, with a buff speckled plumage and reddish wings
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.corncrake - common Eurasian rail that frequents grain fields
crake - any of several short-billed Old World rails
Crex, genus Crex - corncrakes
Translations
Wachtelkönig
ruisrääkkä

corncrake

[ˈkɔːnkreɪk] Nguión m de codornices
References in classic literature ?
Silent, like sorrowing children, the birds have ceased their song, and only the moorhen's plaintive cry and the harsh croak of the corncrake stirs the awed hush around the couch of waters, where the dying day breathes out her last.
Hence it will cause him no surprise that there should be geese and frigate-birds with webbed feet, either living on the dry land or most rarely alighting on the water; that there should be long-toed corncrakes living in meadows instead of in swamps; that there should be woodpeckers where not a tree grows; that there should be diving thrushes, and petrels with the habits of auks.
Nigel Arnold, Lloyds Bank; Nick O'Hara, Thursfields; Russel Dunleavy, Corncrake Properties Ltd; Rob Pettigrew, Thursfields; Chris Peutherer, Shepherd Commercial
THE sound of the corncrake in rural Ireland was as common as that of the blackbird but there is a real danger this wonderful creature will soon be gone forever.
The works carried out will be divided into two stages: - the first stage implemented in 2018 includes the monitoring of: Nutcracker, Corncrake and woodpeckers (green-necked, White-necked and three-toed), - the second stage implemented in 2019 includes: Monitoring of the golden eagle, Capercaillie, Owls (eagle owl, Ural owl, Pygmy owl), Ring-throated thrush and sniper.
Unseasonal surprise of the week was a Corncrake on Bardsey, time fast ebbing away if it hopes to make it back to Africa.
On return to the northern isles she finds a newfound sobriety marked in wild swimming in the Atlantic and work as an RSPB officer surveying the Corncrake.
He tells of the mechanical reaper which once left stubble over 8ins tall, meaning birds like the corncrake, if they had any sense, simply had to duck when they thing went over.
Rare birds such as the corncrake and Greenland white-fronted goose also make their home on the island each year and fly across the proposed wind farm site on their annual migration.
The Outer Hebrides is one of the last strongholds of the corncrake, which has become increasingly scarce on the British mainland because of intensive agriculture.
THE rasping call of the corncrake was, for centuries, a sound that was synonymous with British summertime.
A Corncrake has been heard calling at Tregele, Anglesey, over the last few evenings.