corncrake

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corn·crake

 (kôrn′krāk′)
n.
A common bird (Crex crex) of Eurasia and Africa, having a short bill and brownish-yellow plumage and found in grain fields and meadows.

corncrake

(ˈkɔːnˌkreɪk)
n
(Animals) a common Eurasian rail, Crex crex, of fields and meadows, with a buff speckled plumage and reddish wings
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.corncrake - common Eurasian rail that frequents grain fields
crake - any of several short-billed Old World rails
Crex, genus Crex - corncrakes
Translations
Wachtelkönig
ruisrääkkä

corncrake

[ˈkɔːnkreɪk] Nguión m de codornices
References in classic literature ?
Hence it will cause him no surprise that there should be geese and frigate-birds with webbed feet, either living on the dry land or most rarely alighting on the water; that there should be long-toed corncrakes living in meadows instead of in swamps; that there should be woodpeckers where not a tree grows; that there should be diving thrushes, and petrels with the habits of auks.
Silent, like sorrowing children, the birds have ceased their song, and only the moorhen's plaintive cry and the harsh croak of the corncrake stirs the awed hush around the couch of waters, where the dying day breathes out her last.
The number of corncrakes, known for its rasping call, fell by 39% between 2014 and last year.
Allan said the land, which is home to an unexcavated ancient fort, was inhabited by roe deer, red squirrels and corncrakes - a rare type of bird.
As Ospreys have become established in Wales over the last decade, so Corncrakes have disappeared.
But experts led by the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) are warning the new rules for England and Wales could hit wildlife such as barn owls, corncrakes and red kites.
The ESA recommendations reflect these traditional practices, which include delaying the cutting of hay until August and cutting from the centre of the field outwards to enable birds such as corncrakes to escape to neighbouring fields.
CorncraKes declined dramatically in the 20th century as farming changed, but they have been recovering in western Scotland thanKs to crofters and conservation groups.
A vast tranquil woodland and water meadows, it is home to such species as otters, corncrakes and even flamingos and red squirrels.
But he is most excited about visiting the reserve on the Outer Hebrides in July to see corncrakes which are one of the only British species he has never seen.
Of course, the usual suspects are queuing up to bag the credit: al-Qaeda quickly claimed responsibility, hailing the Lincolnshire attack as "yet another blow against the Evil One in Washington" while the Provisional Wing of the Royal Society for the Protection of Birds put it down to a suicide bird strike by kamikaze corncrakes.