corneal

(redirected from corneal scar)
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Related to corneal scar: Corneal ulcer

cor·ne·a

 (kôr′nē-ə)
n.
The transparent convex anterior portion of the outer fibrous coat of the eyeball that covers the iris and the pupil and is continuous with the sclera.

[Medieval Latin cornea (tēla), horny (tissue), from Latin corneus, horny, from cornū, horn; see ker- in Indo-European roots.]

cor′ne·al (-əl) adj.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.corneal - of or related to the cornea
Translations

corneal

[ˈkɔːnɪəl] ADJcorneal

corneal

[ˈkɔːrniəl] adjcornéen(ne)corned beef [ˌkɔːrndˈbiːf] ncorned-beef mcorned beef hash [ˌkɔːrndˌbiːfˈhæʃ] nhachis m au corned-beef

corneal

adjHornhaut-; corneal lensesLinsen pl

corneal

adj corneal
References in periodicals archive ?
'If they come in with a corneal scar, they might get formulation B.'
Human corneal stroma in a healthy cornea is composed of highly organized lamellae and mitotically quiescent keratocytes with dendritic morphology.[2],[3] Damage from topical drugs, trauma, and infection often leads to a loss of intercellular contact and stimulates keratocyte-fibroblast-myofibroblast transition, increasing the risk of corneal scar formation, corneal opacification, and visual impairment.[2],[4]
(i) Corneal scar formed and stroma cell activated with no hyphae by ICVM at 14 days after corneal debridement.
Recheck of the corneal ulcer at 18 weeks revealed an axial corneal scar with fine, superficial corneal blood vessels.
Nearly 20 percent of such reports involved a central corneal scar, a decrease in visual acuity or required a corneal transplant.
Overall, 213 (19.8%) reports described a patient who had a central corneal scar, had a decrease in visual acuity, or required a corneal transplant following the event.
Trimming of graft was carried out after 3-4 weeks of surgery to allow graft to recede and reduce the corneal scar (Fig.
Common ocular co-morbidities are corneal scar, macular scar and cataract.
There was no significance difference in the duration of work in terms of corneal scar presence (p=0.848) (Table 2).
Microbial keratitis is a serious condition that could result in corneal scar, corneal perforation, and even blindness.
1) but a corneal scar with prolapsing intra-ocular tissue was visible on elevating the upper lid (Fig.
Long-term management includes: refractive correction of the astigmatism generated by a corneal scar, penetrating keratoplasty when the scar compromises the visual axis directly or when there is corneal decompensation due to endothelial cell damage, and cataract surgery if required (4).