corollary

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cor·ol·lar·y

 (kôr′ə-lĕr′ē, kŏr′-)
n. pl. cor·ol·lar·ies
1. A proposition that follows with little or no proof required from one already proven.
2. A deduction or an inference.
3. A natural consequence or effect; a result.
adj.
Consequent; resultant.

[Middle English corolarie, from Latin corōllārium, money paid for a garland, gratuity, from corōlla, small garland; see corolla.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

corollary

(kəˈrɒlərɪ)
n, pl -laries
1. (Logic) a proposition that follows directly from the proof of another proposition
2. an obvious deduction
3. a natural consequence or result
adj
consequent or resultant
[C14: from Latin corollārium money paid for a garland, from Latin corolla garland, from corōna crown]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

cor•ol•lar•y

(ˈkɔr əˌlɛr i, ˈkɒr-; esp. Brit., kəˈrɒl ə ri)

n., pl. -lar•ies.
1. Math. a proposition incidentally proved in proving another proposition.
2. an immediate consequence or easily drawn conclusion.
3. a natural consequence or result.
[1325–75; < Late Latin corollārium corollary, in Latin: money paid for a garland, gratuity. See corolla, -ary]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

cor·ol·lar·y

(kôr′ə-lĕr′ē)
A statement that follows with little or no proof required from an already proven statement.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.corollary - a practical consequence that follows naturally; "blind jealousy is a frequent corollary of passionate love"
aftermath, consequence - the outcome of an event especially as relative to an individual
2.corollary - (logic) an inference that follows directly from the proof of another proposition
illation, inference - the reasoning involved in drawing a conclusion or making a logical judgment on the basis of circumstantial evidence and prior conclusions rather than on the basis of direct observation
logic - the branch of philosophy that analyzes inference
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.

corollary

noun consequence, result, effect, outcome, sequel, end result, upshot The number of prisoners increased as a corollary of the government's crackdown on violent crime.
Collins Thesaurus of the English Language – Complete and Unabridged 2nd Edition. 2002 © HarperCollins Publishers 1995, 2002

corollary

noun
The American Heritage® Roget's Thesaurus. Copyright © 2013, 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
Translations
důsledek
Korollar
följdsatskorollarium

corollary

[kəˈrɒlərɪ] Ncorolario m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

corollary

[kəˈrɒləri] ncorollaire m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

corollary

n(logische) Folge, Korollar nt (also Math); this would prove, as a corollary, that …damit würde dann gleichzeitig auch bewiesen, dass …
adjBegleit-
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

corollary

[kəˈrɒlərɪ] ncorollario
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
It teaches us a lesson of humility, by impressing us with the imperfection of human powers, and by warning us of the many weak points where we are open to the attack of the great enemy of our race; it proves to us that we are in danger of being weak, when our vanity would fain soothe us into the belief that we arc most strong; it forcibly points out to us the vainglory of intellect, and shows us the vast difference between a saving faith and the corollaries of a philosophical theology; and it teaches us to reduce our self-examination to the test of good works.
But these things are only the corollaries of all successful playwriting and of all art.
Theorems 2.2 and 3.2 in [14] and Proposition 4.1 in [13] can be obtained when taking [lambda] = 1/2, respectively in Corollaries 4, 6, and 5.
Note that Corollaries 4 and 5 concern convergent solutions.
That N[[PHI].sub.m](F) = N(F) for the indicated m follows from Theorem 2.3 and Corollaries 4.8 and 4.11, as does the equation [mathematical expression not reproducible] for (m,n) = [p.sup.u] [member of] F(F).
Sections 3 and 4 contain the statements and proofs of the two main results as well as several corollaries and remarks.
Corollaries are obtained for the operators [C.sub.[PHI]] and [M.sub.u].
The next three corollaries are results for the graphs [F.sub.u,n] and [G.sub.u,n].
This theorem enhances three corollaries. As a conjecture for indeterminate forms in classical calculus, ten of new indeterminate forms in Neutrosophic calculus had been constructed.
The reason why we employ an upper limit to describe the theorems and corollaries is that the upper limit makes the stability conditions less conservative.